Class Notes (838,983)
Canada (511,150)
Psychology (5,220)
PSYCH 3CB3 (58)
Lecture

3CB3 Measuring Attitudes- Jan 8th.docx

13 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CB3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Measuring Attitudes­ Day 2 & 5 01/08/2014 Day 2­ January 8  h Semantic Differential Technique (Osgood, Suci & Tennenbaum, 1957) Asks individuals to rate something on a scale from strong to weak, good to bad, active to passive, fast to  slow, etc.  Evaluates attitudes that people have on objects­> view how people feel about them and change the product  (advertising).  E.g Pontiac brand­> slow, old; 1960s they came out with a faster, sportier car Empirically Determined Scales (Thurstone’s Equal Appearing Interval Scale, 1928) Collect ~100 statements reflecting different opinions or evaluations of attitude object. Many judges sort statements into piles, depending on degree of attitude. Number on each statement depending on the degree of positivity or negativity. Scale value of item= median of judges’ assignments.  Look for items that have a narrow spread, doesn’t change much­> becomes relatively negative or positive.  Pick a few of items of that numerical judgment which are presented to an audience to evaluate them­>  assess attitudes. E.g “too much love will kill you” is rated at a 1 (negative) and “love is all that matters” is rated at an 8.5  (positive). Calculate the average of the statements presented to them that were rated.  Likert’s Summated Rating Scale, 1932 Collect statements reflecting different opinions or evaluations of attitude object. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement?  Separate judges with 25% of the most negative and most positive separately­> chose those statements that  best discriminate between the positive and negative evaluations.  These statements are then included in the final survey. Popular scale because it is useful and easy to use. Reversed scored when the statements are negative (instead of 1 to 5, to 5 to 1).  Explicit Measures: Advantages & Disadvantages Simply asking people their opinions Advantages: Quick and easy to administer Quantitative results for statistical analysis Scored by computer Assumptions & Disadvantages: Assume conscious access to attitudes­> assumes that people can access these opinions on things. Assume cognitive storage of attitudes­> assume that someone has an attitude on something Sometimes our attitudes are created on the fly Sensitive to context effects­> the ways the questions are worded, our mood, where you are, what you are  thinking of. Prior experience (immediately) Perceptions about expectations of researcher Presence of other people Cultural, social expectations about appropriate responses Steps in Answering­ Context Effects Decode and understand questions  Decide what the questions is asking (may be different depending on the person; “rate the effectiveness  of your instructor.”)  Retrieve relevant information Information that is retrieved will depend on the information retrieved from previous questions.  Life Satisfaction­> Marital Satisfaction (correlation of about +.32) Marital Satisfaction­> Life Satisfaction (+.67)­> because thinking first about satisfaction it their marital life  will be included in the life satisfaction section.  Respondents elaborate the first option­ ‘easier’ rather than harder. On rating scale, choose first response in ‘latitude of acceptance’ E.g “Should divorce be easier to get, or harder to get?” OR “Should divorce be harder to get, or easier to  get?” Acquiescence effects­> tendency to say yes because people prefer to be agreeable.  Respondents tend to agree with any statement One study found correlation of only ­.22 between mutually exclusive options. Krosnick et al: Across 10 studies, 52% agree with the statement, but only 42% disagree with its  opposite.  More common in lower IQ individuals, lower educated, more difficult questions, near end of long  questionnaires, in phone vs face to face interviews.  Fit response to alternatives provided Our attitude may not be accurately reflected by the possible answers. Scale items and numbers can bias responses­> 0­10 vs ­5 to +5­> ­5 is considered to some catastrophic  events happening and being very unsuccessful and will make there answer higher. People will choose the categorical alternative closest to theirs, even if theirs is not present.  Schuman & Presser (1981): 62%­ “ to think for themselves” as most important skill for children to prepare for life when it is listed as an  option. 5%­ list it when question is open­ended People will choose an option even if they have no opinion. Giljam & Granberg (1993): Nuclear Power Plant 15% choose “No opinion” when available 4% do not respond when “No Opinion” unavailable Reliability is higher when all scale points are labeled rather than just the extremes.  Reliability decreases beyond 7 alternatives: hard to make such fine distinctions.  “Is my teacher an 8 or a 9?” th Day 5­ January 15  – missed class Structure and Function of Attitudes Believed that we have stored representations of our attitudes How are related attitudes stored? Theory: we access information relative to an attitude object and we come up with an attitude on the spot.  Context effects may be relevant then because they predict the way that we determine our attitudes on the  spot. If attitudes are stored, what part of them is stored and where are they stored and what elements are stored?  What is the relationship between implicit and explicit attitudes? Each different model of attitudes suggests different storage and representation of attitudes­> by testing how  attitudes are stored we may be able to agree about WHAT an attitude really is.  Can also tell us of how to change attitudes Different storage of attitudes­> tell us how these attitudes are formed­> determine behaviour.  Some attitudes, based on how they are formed or their importance to us may be stored or  formed/structured differently. Structures of Attitudes Consistency Consistency across­> same attitude at one time compared to another, more often consistency  between the components of an attitude. An attitude is influenced by emotions­> feel certain ways towards attitude object(s) Beliefs about things Behaviours towards attitudes Ambivalent attitudes­> positive and negative feelings towards a specific attitude objects (cognitions).  Inconsistency within the cognitive domain May also have ambivalent feelings about an attitude object­> cognitive and emotional. May have a positive cognitive (nice person), negative emotions (dislike) or vise versa.  Accessibility  Speed at which we can access attitudes­> where the attitude is stored, importance, etc may effect our  ability to access these attitudes. What determines accessibility?  Strength  Assume that strong attitudes are more readily accessible­> really important attitudes, extreme or intense  attitudes.  How attitudes come to be strong attitudes?  Are they stored differently which determines the strength of  these attitudes? Value of the attitude, to what degree does it shape one’s behaviour.  Models of Attitude Structure and Storage Fishbein & Ageson (1970s): The Expectancy Valued Model Attitudes are nothing but cognitions with varying degrees of strength. A series of qualities, beliefs about certain attitude objects­> quality is expressed as a probability of the  extent to which the individual possesses this quality.  All qualities are not equally relevant or important to us Attitude­> collection of these qualities Attitudes shape our emotions and behaviours but does not necessarily determine it.  Zanna & Rempel (1980s): One Factor Model­ weighted versions of all three factors (ABCs­> Affect,  Behaviour, Cognition). The attitude importance is determined by the extent to which it is able to help us reach our goals.  To what extent does this attitude represent positive or negative emotions, tendency to approach or avoid an  object­> cognitions about an object­> attitude. (1980s): Two Factors Factors: affect and cognition are involved in attitudes Collection of cognitions and emotions and the relationship between them is the attitude. No behavioural components­> these two combined shapes behaviour.  Three Factor Model (1950s/60s): Three parts to an attitude­> cognitive (beliefs), affect (emotions) and behaviours (past behaviours towards  the object/person). Correlations between all three­> affect to behaviour, cognitive to behaviour. Less correlated these factors are, the more ambivalent our attitudes are­> less ambivalent= more  consistency.  Combination of affect, accessible cognitions or beliefs and past experiences ARE the attitude­> what we  store and report as attitudes. How do we decide which model is correct? Validity­> the relationship between the model and reality Convergent validity: measures of attitudes are correlated are similar to those of the model. Do not get high correlations between the different components of attitudes (affect, behavioural, cognitive).  Measures within one component are correlated (e.g different measures of the cognitive component).  Discriminate validity: one particular model is more plausible than other models (statistically).  One study showed that the Three Factors model was better than the One Factor, other study said that the  One Factor model was better than both the 2 and 3 Factor model. Different modes of storage­> different models may be better at explaining the storage of a particular attitude  better than another model.  Measuring Attitudes­ Day 3 01/08/2014 Day 3­ January 10  h Edit or censor response May not censor answers when any answer to these questions can be socially or culturally accepted.  More common when question is threatening or of a sensitive nature­> racial,  ethnic, religious prejudice, political, sexual activities, etc.  Edit to make ourselves sound more desirable or socially acceptable. More common in face­to­face interviews Reduced by assuring confidentiality Other techn
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CB3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit