SOC 202 Lecture Notes - Lecture 3: Cultural Studies, Sharon Stone, Judith Butler

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W3
1
Week 3: Introduction Conclusion, Class and Audience
Social Representation
- Social representation:
a) Allows us to classify each other, compare and explain behaviours and to objectify
eah other as a part of our soial settig ie. He/ she doest elog
b) Establishes an order which enables us to locate ourselves in our material and social
worlds
c) Enables communication within a community by providing us with a social exchange,
and for naming and classifying the various aspects of the social world and our (and
others) group history
Representing Class
- Emile Durkheim Collective Representation:
- The proesses of olletie eaig akig resultig i oo uderstadigs hih
produe soial ods uitig soieties, orgaizatios ad groups
- Common ways of conceiving, thinking about and evaluating social reality
- Ex. The initial response when seeing homeless people
3 Types of Representation
1. Hegemonic Representation
- Shared by most of the members of a structured group Canadians that are uniform
and prevail as the norm: terrorists are bad
2. Emancipated Representation
- Refers to subgroups that create their own representation with a certain degree of
autonomy with respect to the interacting segments of society: vegans, radical groups
3. Polemic Representation
- Related to social conflicts, struggles btwn groups, and controversies in a society
- Determined by antagonistic relations and intended to be exclusive to that group
- Ex. Communism in a capitalist country, or cultural struggles or debate in restrictive
societies
The Under and Working Class
- Skeggs 2004:
- Pop Culture is marked by a tendency to position the lower classes economically,
politically and ideologically as a lass i stagatio
- Coo tropes are used i hih ke eleets are idetified as lass ad or raial
arkers
- Viewed up as excessive, tasteless, with disgust and as a source of humor or mockery
- Ex. Honey Boo Boo
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Document Summary

The pro(cid:272)esses of (cid:862)(cid:272)olle(cid:272)ti(cid:448)e (cid:373)ea(cid:374)i(cid:374)g (cid:373)aki(cid:374)g resulti(cid:374)g i(cid:374) (cid:272)o(cid:373)(cid:373)o(cid:374) u(cid:374)dersta(cid:374)di(cid:374)gs (cid:449)hi(cid:272)h produ(cid:272)e so(cid:272)ial (cid:271)o(cid:374)ds u(cid:374)iti(cid:374)g so(cid:272)ieties, orga(cid:374)izatio(cid:374)s a(cid:374)d groups(cid:863) Common ways of conceiving, thinking about and evaluating social reality. Shared by most of the members of a structured group canadians that are uniform and prevail as the norm: terrorists are bad: emancipated representation. Refers to subgroups that create their own representation with a certain degree of autonomy with respect to the interacting segments of society: vegans, radical groups: polemic representation. Related to social conflicts, struggles btwn groups, and controversies in a society. Determined by antagonistic relations and intended to be exclusive to that group. Communism in a capitalist country, or cultural struggles or debate in restrictive societies. Pop culture is marked by a tendency to position the lower classes economically, politically and ideologically as a (cid:862)(cid:272)lass i(cid:374) stag(cid:374)atio(cid:374)(cid:863) Co(cid:373)(cid:373)o(cid:374) tropes are used i(cid:374) (cid:449)hi(cid:272)h ke(cid:455) ele(cid:373)e(cid:374)ts are ide(cid:374)tified as (cid:862)(cid:272)lass a(cid:374)d or ra(cid:272)ial (cid:373)arkers(cid:863)

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