Class Notes (834,037)
Canada (508,290)
Archaeology (314)
ARCH 100 (120)
Lecture

ARCH 100 - January 31, 2011.docx

6 Pages
264 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Archaeology
Course
ARCH 100
Professor
Ross Jamieson
Semester
Winter

Description
ARCH 100 – January 31, 2011 Holocene Transitions - Worldwied changes after 10,000 BP o Climate o Complex hunter-gatherers and foragers o Sea levels rose 130-150 metres o Flooding cut off Americas, Britain, Australia, etc o Drowned coastlines o Magdalenian Europe Mesolithic Technology - Transition to Mesolithic/ Early Holocene Technology - Sleds, canoes, groundstone tools Complex Hunter-Gatherers - Abundant, predictable, storable resources - Anadromouse fish, shellfish, nuts, seeds - Systems of resource procurement and storage - Subsistence strategy Control over Surplus - Unequal distribution - Kin, lineage, clain, higher social ranks & privileges, individual or kin group - specialized craft production, controlled by elite Competitive Feasting - Differential wealth distribution - Prestige, competitive feasting - Intensification of exchange - Warfare Mesolithic Europe - 10,000 to 5,000 BP - End of age ice to introduction to farming - Decisuous (oak, hazel, elm) forests to replace tundra - Reindeer, hourse replaced by red deer, roe deer, elk Intensified Resource Use - Birds, fish, shellfish, game - Nets, fishhooks, spears, dugout canoes, baskets - Acorns, processed Storage - Preservation, seasonal - Smoking, pits, containers - Dewllings Ertebølle Culture - Intense coastal occupations - Year-round occupation - Vedbaek, Denmark Fishing - Harpoons, antler, bone tools - Hunting sea mammals, fowl - Special purpose sites Cemeteries - Increased cultural complexity - Grave goods - 4000 BC, Vedbaek (*BC not BP) - Gender and age differences in grave goods Nature of Agricultre - Most important Holcene development - Neolithic (New Stone Age) - Total realignment of tasks in society Lineage Ownership - Farmland, livestock as property of lineages - Corporate ownership of resources - Stability, predictability - Conflict resolution Define Domestication - “human induced morphological change in plants and animals that renders the species dependent on humans for reproduction and survival” Process of Domestication - About 15 major domesticated plants in the world, even less diversity of domestic animals - No new economically significant domesticates since Neolithic - Narrowed resource diversity causes erosion of genetic resources, disease susceptibility Storage - Stored food surpluses implies sedentism of people - Granaries, pits, other archaeologically visible remains - Craft and religious specialization - Increased social complexity Domestication - Morphological and genetic changes - Altered reproduction patterns - Propagation dependent on humans - Feral, escaped cultivars Plant Domestication - Cereals and beans - Southwest Asia: wheats and barley - Far East: rice and millet - Africa: millet and sorghum - Americas: maize and beans Sunflower - Also known as “apical dominance” - Harvesting, selection pressure toward fewer and larger seedheads - Many domestic plants cannot self-propagate - These are biological features archaeologists can look for Animal Domestication - Control of reproductive success - Result in m
More Less

Related notes for ARCH 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit