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Lecture

ENGL 103W Lecture Notes - Medical Drama, Misanthropy, Aeschylus


Department
English
Course Code
ENGL 103W
Professor
Torsten Kehler

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Wednesday, January 9, 2013
LECTURE #2
(ENGL103) INTRO TO DRAMA
RECAP ON MONDAY’S LECTURE:
Readings
1) Aeschylus
2) Oresteia
First assignment: Two weeks from today, a short mini essay. Topic is TBA.
COURSE CONTENT
All about drama
What is drama? Drama is …
Actors do not necessarily mean characters
Depict action
Various genres: Comic, melodramatic, serious, etc.
i) Sub-genres: television drama, medical drama, misanthrope (somebody who
dislikes people) A convenient way to lump things together.
Tragedy
i) Famous, notorious Greek tragedies
ii) Tragedy translated means “goat song
iii) Very little known origins
CONTEXT VS SETTING
Context refers to when/where something takes place
- Historical location, cultural
e.g. Context of ancient Greek drama is the ancient world (Athens)
Setting refers to a physical place, where a story takes place
More on the ancient Greek world…
A group of city states that shared anethos” = lifestyle, cultural and political
- Sharing food/diet, culture (art), and religion
- Especially literary art, drama*
- Told stories by singing songs, these singers then put on costumes?
- Sacrificed animals, sacrificial ritual (maybe that’s how the goat got involved)
- Athenians loved dramas: contests, prizes (City Dionysia) <- God of intoxication, they
even held festivals for him
- Athens is the cultural centre, large population (built amphitheaters)
- Only men allowed on stage, for female parts as well
Actors wore masks to express emotions for the audience who sit far away.
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