Class Notes (836,326)
Canada (509,734)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM1301 (295)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2 John Locke.doc

5 Pages
110 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM1301
Professor
Carolyn Gordon
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 2­ John Locke  January 24, 2012  • Second treatise of Government: Published in 1689  • Locke is the founder of modern day liberalism  • Everything that you take for granted (rights) were given through John Locke • In Locke’s world I can’t do as I please, in Hobbes’s world you can (fundamental difference) • Locke lays down principles that can’t be done away with  • Discourse of rights is crucial to bring back power to the people  • Locke is writing in a time that decent is highly frowned upon, like saying something against  the government  • He is writing this completely against monarchy  • He is a lot more against the sovereign than he wrote, because it would have been difficult  for him to publish his book because it has to be approved by the king  • The ability to make laws or to put people to death is a right that government has  • For Hobbes, its not the right, it’s the excess power that allows them to kill you  • It is a right that government has because of us  • We gave government this right  • Governments right only come from the people, so that the government only stands for the  people • This is not an absolute right, it is a right that comes with particular conditions, and duties • Responsibilities to the people  • The key figure is the people, not the government • This is very different from Hobbes because he believes that government is the answer • In Locke’s world, the key is the people, which government should reflect  • The reason that we give government this right is to preserve life and our property  • Internal preservation within society • External preservation­ don’t want foreign nations invading you  • We come together because of internal and external preservation • We do all of this under the banner of what Locke calls the public good • Were doing for us, making government for us  • State of nature vs. State of war • If you have a state or condition where there is no government= a state of nature (Hobbes  and Locke go together on this) • Difference between Locke and Hobbes­ For Locke, state of war is created when some one  by force without right takes upon it to take something from you, that belongs to you by right • Crucial because for Hobbes when you move into a state where there is government, there  will be good condition • For Locke, even with a government you can be in a state of war • Even government can without right take away particular rights that belong to, this causes a  state of war with and against government  • Just getting out of a state of nature is not enough  • When in a state of government it is crucial to maintain rights  • Locke­ State of war is hostility, destruction, violence  • Believes that men should be treated as beast of prey  • Happens when someone tries to take absolute power over someone else (slavery), and  you have the absolute right to protect yourself • State of nature is actually a state of peace, goodwill, preservation and it is a state in which  reason takes hold • Reason is very important for Hobbes and Locke  • State of nature­ Perfect freedom  • Also a state (like Hobbes idea) that we are all essentially equal in that we all have the  same capacity to do  • Like Hobbes, Locke believes in a state of nature, you have executive authority over  yourself, you are the author of your own destiny, no one is telling you what to do • For Locke there is a very fine line between a state of nature and a state of war • Can easily slip from a state of nature to a state of war • Locke believes that you can always slip back  • Locke believes that when people join government they give up certain things, he wants to  say that when we join together and give up our sense of freedom, he believes that  government should give up something  • What do I get for giving up perfect freedom? • He wants to impose certain duties and responsibilities on government  • Locke wants to bring equality in the continuum between the people and government • Weak relationship because the state of nature will not always hold, so you are lacking  certainty (Hobbes and Locke are on the same page here) • People need government because of the problem of certainty  • Want to minimize uncertainty or turn it into certainty • Just like Hobbes, Locke says the solution to this problem is the ability to think for ourselves  • The ability think tells us to come together and work towards something  • Locke, it is from here that you get the formation of government, the only difference is while  reason is grounding everything, Locke is troubled by rights • Rights allow putting limitations on government  • The Basis for Society • Locke believes that government is important, but a civil government • The Foundations of Political Society  • You must give up our executive power (ability to do as you please) • Must give it up in equal amounts • Giving up some power is better than being uncertain about the future • For Hobbes, the excess power belongs to government • For Locke, when you resign freedom, you are resigning it to us, not government • For Locke, we are government  • Hobbes demonstrates a very clear difference between people and government • For Locke, it is almost like they become one and the same because we are government   • We have given up our freedom, but we still really have it • This is an important difference between Hobbes and Locke • He is saying government can’t do as you please  • In a Hobbes world, government can do as it pleases because the sovereign is always right,  Locke is saying that this is not the 
More Less

Related notes for CRM1301

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit