Class Notes (834,966)
Canada (508,836)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM3317 (35)
Lecture

Academic Crim and Popular Crim.docx

6 Pages
82 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM3317
Professor
Kate Fletcher
Semester
Winter

Description
ACADEMIC CRIMINOLOGY AND POPULAR CRIMINOLOGY MASS MEDIA AND CRIME • Crime, Criminality, Criminal Justice → three different definition • These fictional depictions offer as much real potential as looking at things in a more factual empirical way  • Academic criminology often dismisses the source of where people engage with these ideas (as scholars we write it off “what  can comic books teach us about crime”) • Texts through which we can draw attention where we can get lots of ideas  • Mass media → this concept was coined in 1920 with advent of nation wide radio networks  • Mass circulation of newspapers • Books and transcripts have always existed  • Newspaper produced and passed onto a large amount of people  • Mainstream media → because intended for large audience  o Certain ways media is produced so it can be consumed by a wide array of individuals o Certain logic of media, that a large amount of population with different backgrounds and experience o Mainstream media is geared for everyone! (but geared for the lowest common denominator → people at the  bottom of intelligence can consume and understand)  • Broadcast (Television, Film)  • Print (magazines and book)  • Internet • Enlightenment = crime news o Using aspect of dramatization to make their news pieces sexy o Start to blur whats news and whats drama • Entertainment = crime drama • The two together = “infotainment” • Public has deep fascination with this stuff o Many crime shows o Criminal minds is most popular show on TV o Everyday normal people have an interest in this stuff o First reality shows were crime shows  Cops  Americas most wanted • The line between factual and fictional is very blurry ACADEMIC CRIMINOLOGY • Structured in particular ways • Body of knowledge regarding crime as a social phenomenon • Examine making laws, breaking laws and reacting towards breaking laws • Develop a body of knowledge of general and verifiable principles and of other types of knowledge  regarding this process of law, crime and treatment • When something is verifiable you can prove or disprove it • Systematic study of crime  o Etiology  What causes crime o Extent  Crime rates, distribution  Why certain people are over represented?   Nature • The form that crime takes • Why are certain things labelled crimes and others not • Or in certain contexts criminal but not in other contexts  Prevention • How do we prevent crime? • What are the best methods? o Law and justice  Why are certain crimes more punished than others?  What is the value of certain punishments such as imprisonment?  What is justice? • But often look at these things with an aesthetic eye of precision o Want it to be verifiable o Random samples o Validity o Reliability • Aesthetics of authority/ objectivity o Eliminate first­person o In­text referencing  Credibility  Been tested and proven  Other people are also agreeing with it o Equations, tables, statistics  More authoritative  Credibility • But criminologists often have little impact on public policy des
More Less

Related notes for CRM3317

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit