Class Notes (838,472)
Canada (510,904)
Economics (966)
ECO1102 (273)
David Gray (100)
Lecture

Chapter 6 - Measuring the Cost of Living.docx

9 Pages
67 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECO1102
Professor
David Gray
Semester
Winter

Description
ECO1102D Chapter 6 – Measuring the Cost of Living YUJIE YI (Nicole) Jan 22 , 2014 Chapter 6 – Measuring the Cost of Living  Two Types of Deflators   Consumer Price Index  ­ CPI  ­ Used to measure evolution in the cost of living.   GDP deflator  ­ Has a much broader base.  ­ Supposed to reflect the prices of all goods that are produced domestically.   Learning how to USE and INTERPRET the deflators is more important than learning  how to calculate their values.   Figure 6.2 in the text book shows the evolution (i.e. the changes over time) of both of  these deflators from 1965 to 2011.  ­ They tend to move together.  ­ Since early 1990s, very moderate inflation.  Illustration of GDP deflator  1  /9  Take the following as given:  ­ Year 1, 100 (the base year)  ­ Year 7, 118.1  ­ Year 8, 121.9  ­ Year 9, 125.1  ­ Year 10, 1.1% inflation   Year 8 and 7, (121.9 / 118.1 – 1) * 100 = 3.2% annual inflation rate.   Year 9 and 8, (125.1 / 121.9 – 1) * 100 = 2.6% annual inflation rate.   What about this minus one business?  ­ How to calculate the growth rate: ΔP / P  P tP t−1¿/P t−1=P /Pt t−11  Inflation between years t and t­1 = ( ­ Multiply by 100 in order to convert to a percentage.  Working in the other direction:   ­ (x / 125.1 – 1) * 100 = 1.1  ­ X / 125.1 = 1.011 or x = 126.5 for the index in year 10.  ECO1102D Chapter 6 – Measuring the Cost of Living YUJIE YI (Nicole) Jan 22 , 2014  Working over a longer period:  ­ In year 1, the base year, index = 100.  ­ The cumulative inflation over the 9 year period is (125.1 / 100 – 1) * 100 = 25.1%   These types of calculations will be expected from you. (EXAM)  Some real figures for Consumer Price Index (CPI):  ­ Consider the following information   November 2012 CPI = 121.9.   October 2013 CPI = 123.   November 2013 CPI = 123.   2002 CPI = 100 (the base year).   Based on buying habits, 2009.  ­ From those figures, we can determine that:   Prices in November 2013 are 23% higher now compared to 2002.  Interpretation: The good that cost 100 in 2002, not it costs 123 to buy in 2013.   3 /9  The annual rate of inflation from November 2012 to November 2013 = +0.9%   The rate of inflation from November 2013 to October 2013 = 0%   If that annual rate (+0.9%) were to continue for 10 years, this would translate  10 into  (1.009) −1¿∗100=(1.009−1)∗100=9.37 ­ Although in this case multiplying 0.9% by 10 gives an approximation of 9% for the  true value of 9.4%, the appropriate operation is exponentiation because price  changes are compounded on each other.  Example of Compounding   Suppose an interest rate of 10% per year and a time period of 12 years.  ­ With compounding, $1 would grow to $3.13 for an increase of 213%.  (1+0.1) −1¿∗100=213∨$2.13  total interest paid  ­ Without compounding, the interest is applied only to the initial value of $1, and the  total amount would be $2.20 for an increase of 120%.   (1 + 0.1 * 12 – 1) * 100 = 120% or $120 total interest paid.   Core inflation = CPI stripped of the prices of those goods and services with the most  volatile prices, esp. energy.  ­ Designed to reflect longer­term trends.  Construction of CPI (figure 6.1)  ECO1102D Chapter 6 – Measuring the Cost of Living YUJIE YI (Nicole) Jan 22 , 2014  The approximate weights for the CPI are:  ­ Food 16.1%.  ­ Shelter: 27.5%.  ­ Household operations and furniture: 11.8%.  ­ Clothes / shoes: 5.6%.  ­ Transport: 19.3%.  ­ Health, personal care: 5%.  ­ Recreational, education, reading: 11.8%.  ­ Tobacco, alcohol: 3%.   Each of these weights is attached to its corresponding price level in order to calculate the  overall deflator, which measures the price level for a synthesized, composite good.  ­ Then the inflation is calculated as before.   Every year (or whatever tim
More Less

Related notes for ECO1102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit