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Jayne Baker (345)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2 January 10.docx

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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC100H5
Professor
Jayne Baker

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Lecture 2 January 10, 2013 The growth of science – becoming prestigious science of society; Emile Durkheim positivism – research can be objective and valued . Move towards science = move away from religion industrial revolution and capitalism – brought changes to how people made a living and where they lived. capitalism – free market place. Factory owners wanted to compete, so they brought down the wages of the workers Urbanization – moved from farms to cities. Conditions were overcrowded and poor. Rise of states and political revolutions – state = governing structure government started to have a lot more control over citizens. Responsible for roads and infrastructure; operating schools and prisons. A lot of people didn’t like it, therefore revolution. Theories - has to me empirical - has to be sociological Structural functionalism Durkheim – society needs to function together; if one part breaks down, most likely others will break down too Tended to put greater priority towards the society over personal. Macro > micro Really interested in stability and equilibrium EX. education – schools serve the purpos
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