Class Notes (834,557)
Canada (508,597)
Psychology (7,776)
PSYC18H3 (334)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2.docx

4 Pages
113 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC18H3
Professor
Gerald Cupchik
Semester
Winter

Description
Emotion as an ancient phenomenon 2.1. Plato and Aristotle. Plato Aristotle Theory Three parts of a soul: Three psyches: 1. Reason – ideal, immortal and divine.  1. Nutritive: found in plants. Most basic, fundamental functions –  Home of cognition and rational mind.  reproduction, growth, self maintenance through nutrition.  First proposed by naturalist/formalist  whom separated the intellectual and  2. Sensitive: found in animals, more complex. Added: sensation  sensual world. It is not organic/bodily. and pain, emotion, imagination. Perform automatic form of  memory (recognition of familiarity).  2. Passion – Motivation, courage, place  for complex emotion. Happen when  3. Rational: in human. Can accomplish specific complex abstract  we engage in interaction.  thinking, think, weighs decision and act upon logic, recollection  (effortful specific search of memory).  3. Appetite—Sensual desire, sex, more  basic emotion that prompt us to look  *The three psyches are listed in increasing complexity by nature.  after our body and fulfill our needs. It  is the MOST corrupt part.   ▯Animal vs. human distinction:  *Passion and appetite are the source of  • Emotion in sensitive (both human and animal has it). emotion and are given moral treatment.  *Sensible vs. intelligible distinction is  • Reason and emotion in rational (only in human). maintained (formalist/naturalist).  • Emotion is unchecked in animal.  *Reasoning is valued by Aristotle OVER emotion. (Plato only believes in  reason).     ­By ways of nature, emotion is organic, reason is in human only, and it is  naturally and structurally superior.  Implication  ▯ Theory of forms: we are born with innate  • Knowledge can be attained through sensory and emotional  for education  knowledge called forms/episteme. They are  experience &  fixed and does not change. The goal of education  Suggestions.  should be to help us reawaken it. The soul is  • No innate universal  reincarnated into different lives.  • Tabula Rosa (mind is a blank slate). • Sensory and emotional information is  *Emotional experiences are not passive, they depend on  called Doxa, they are useless and  hinder us in finding true wisdom.  evaluation (judgment based on our self­determined standards.  Hence, we are the author of our emotion & author of the  evaluation.) • Don’t look outside of you, or how your  body act upon environment, look  Ex: Smiling give us a good feeling, because we evaluated it in a  positive light.  inwardly.  Aristotle’s Rhetoric­­ Persuasive persona:  1. Act like a good person. ( 2. Make your argument seem honest.  3. Evoke emotions.   Quote: you need to evoke emotion that makes the most sense, appeal to the  person’s properties. Ex: pity, hope, greed. 2.2 Epicureanism & Stoicism Background: The Hellenistic Period ­ when & what was it like?  ▯ Between the civil war (between Spartans and Athen)  in Greece and the establishment of Roman empire. Chaotic atmosphere, scholar use emotion  to give suggestions to the public on how to live through this period.   - Both agreed: good life is achieved by properly managing and understanding emotion. - Suppression vs. prevention: prevention is easier, hence it is important to analyze the cause, and physical and mental activities need in order  to avoid feeling the emotion.  Epicureanism Stoicism ­Moderation: eat, drink, own what you need. ­Don’t desire anything, don’t have goals at all. ­Greatest threat to happiness is excessive consumption. ­Go with what you are given (they are what you are  meant to have). ­Does not ban pleasure in consuming humble fare. ­Religion: predestination.  ­Human nature: emotional animal and rational human. Emotion is  adaptive, we feel emotion and it propagate our gene, but left  ­Trust things will end up as they SHOULD. unchecked without reason, then we will be the same as animal.  Hence, to be a proper human,  we need to exercise self control and  ­Desire is needless, it will only cause unnecessary  not thinking about unnecessary things. suffering.  ­Lack of goal is good, for goals can lead to unhappiness. Roman empire & Christianity Long going hatred between the two groups, until one empire decides to accept Christianity. How to convert pagan  masses?  ▯ St. Augustine (Integrated pagan thought with Christian doctrine, emphasizes similarities.) Plato’s Christianity  *Implication: we have an innate knowledge of  God. Look inwardly and make connection  1. Rational mind Soul emotionally with God, do not focus on  emotion and sensory experience such as lust,  2. Immortal mind  Given a place by religion. (with god). desire. 3. Forbid trusting sensory  Sensory experience taboo. experience - The difference:  ▯Reasoning: favored by plato, but forbidden by the church. People should take what they’re given and trust it. ▯ motion: forbidden by plato, but it is okay with the Church as long as it is directed to God.  The medieval period With the fall of Roman empire, the church lost its main ally. Many invading tribes caused economic depression.  • The dark ages - Church feel threatened, and begin exerting emotional control. *The 7 deadly sins! Gluttony, lust, avarice, envy, anger, sloth, pride. (emotional sinner).  - Monks exemplify the ideal lifestyle (focus inwardly with God, non­emotional lifestyle). - Control of the masses, and outrageous few (imprisoned or executed).  • Dark ages relieved - Increased stability in social structure by: papacy (reinforce church power, give structural) and Feudal systems (lord makes agreement with  farmers, by providing them some harvest and land, which in return the farmers shall fight for the lords in time of war). - Church feel secure, relax on religious practice: perhaps sensory experience and reason can supplement faith.  ▯ t. Aquinas (c
More Less

Related notes for PSYC18H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit