Class Notes (1,200,000)
CA (650,000)
UTSG (50,000)
English (1,000)
Lecture

ENG210 LEC03


Department
English
Course Code
ENG210Y1
Professor
Michael Boughn

This preview shows half of the first page. to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Lecture 3
- 1. Byzantine, 1300s
- Iconography – very flat (2D) (no interest in creating a 3D illusion)
- Exist in a space in what matters is what’s up and down, not behind or in front
oThe divine (the spirit) is the focus
- Each conventional representation (gesture) has a meaning (of spiritual means)
- Realism – not reality but conventional
oNo concerns with conventions of realism
- Baby Jesus represents God
- 2. Emphasizes the 2 central figures
- Characters do not look human
- Above characters is the heavenly realms
- 3, 4. Similar as above 2
- 5. Cimabue, 1280 introduces conventions which reshapes Renaissance art
- Still no 3D
- Baby Jesus looks more like a child
- 2 main characters are surrounded by other human figures
- 6. Giotto
- 7. Dirck Bouts, 1465
- Baby Jesus is recognizable as baby
- Development of conventions 3D!!
- Realism beginning to assert itself
- Characters look more human
- From flat and sharp to round and soft throughout years
oStill divine figures but redefined
- 8. Convention being represented
- Vanishing point
- Convention that allows 3D space on 2D surface
- 9. van Eyck, 1436, and 10. Rogier van der Weyden, 1450
o9. 3D characters in 3D world
More human
o10. Humans/figures existing in human world
- 11. Piero della Francesco, 1420s
- Perspective: 2 mains in front of 2 other smaller figures
- 12. Bellini, 1480s
- World in background, characters more human
- 13. Leonardo da Vinci, 1490
- 14. Luca Cambiaso, c. 1550
- Figures of nobility (aristocratic)
- Now, 2 figures, look more worldly
oBaby’s eyes look more worldly
oMom=peasant
oA more common family
- 15. Caravaggio, c. 1600
- Dirt on feet of mom now (barefoot) but with halo around head
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version