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Lecture 3

Notes on the Week 3 Reading

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Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL305Y1
Professor
Prof Fonseca

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PMLAH - Ch3
Independence and Its Consequences
- The independence movements of the early 1800s did not want to revolutionize the social order
of latin america but merely control it themselves.
- Latin American elites found their justification in the liberalism that had been bred and nurtured
but the American and French revolutions/independence movements
- The Catholic church was originally a big proponent of liberalism but a rivalry between the two
parties soon emerged.
- Once the creoles were in power and the ethos of emergency dissipated the creole elites fell
into a conservative inertia that tried to stall social progress any further and created anti-liberal
policies (these conservative powers however were contended in most latin american countries)
- though slavery was abolished the relationships between owners and workers tended to remain
the same.
War to the death - Simon Bolivar
- fiery and poetic language
- unites people under the americano banner
- promises that spaniards not on the sides of the american republic will be shot and ignorant
americans will be pardoned.
- Spaniards and Canary Islanders, you will die, though you be neutral, unless you actively
espouse the cause of Americas liberation. Americans, you will live, even if you have
trespassed.
The vision of Father Morelos - Enrique Krause
- tells the story of a seemingly idealistic preist who was an agent of change and seems to have
truly believes in the latent content of the words he spoke unlike bolivar.
- Priest likely divorced from the mechanisms of change outside civil society
- furthers the all encompassing americano propoganda
- was not for any other religion other than roman catholicism
Argentinas Black Legions - G. Reid Andrews
- black inclusion in the armed forces of independence movements in the early 19th century in
latin america was scarry and worrisome for greater society. there was fear that, having been
suppressed and treated as subbordinate class they will use their force against the organs of
government in an attempt to change it and secondly that black participation in state military
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Description
PMLAH - Ch3 Independence and Its Consequences - The independence movements of the early 1800s did not want to revolutionize the social order of latin america but merely control it themselves. - Latin American elites found their justification in the liberalism that had been bred and nurtured but the American and French revolutionsindependence movements - The Catholic church was originally a big proponent of liberalism but a rivalry between the two parties soon emerged. - Once the creoles were in power and the ethos of emergency dissipated the creole elites fell into a conservative inertia that tried to stall social progress any further and created anti-liberal policies (these conservative powers however were contended in most latin american countries) - though slavery was abolished the relationships between owners and workers tended to remain the same. War to the death - Simon Bolivar - fiery and poetic language - unites people under the americano banner - promises that spaniards not on the sides of the american republic will be shot and ignorant americans will be par
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