Class Notes (835,108)
Canada (508,934)
Psychology (3,518)
PSY100H1 (1,627)
Lecture

health motivation lecture.docx

12 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100H1
Professor
Ashley Waggoner Denton
Semester
Winter

Description
Motivation Health lecture 03/04/2014 Motivation: • Drive= psychological state that encourages behaviour that satisfy needs • E.g. hunger (drive) ▯ motivate to find food /eating ▯ satisfy need aka food  Encourage behavior by increasing arousal  • • Drives▯ Arousal • Arousal▯Motivation • Motivation▯ Performance  • Yerkes Dodson Law= moderate levels of arousal will lead to optimal quality of performance, high  or low arousal won’t lead to good performance quality  • Maslov’s hierarchy of needs: need to fulfill needs from the bottom up . basic▯psychological▯  self fulfillment needs  • Problems with this: there’s actually no need to fill the bottom first before the higher levels  WW2 POW= able to survive by fulfilling psychological needs even if the basic needs aren’t  being met  Self actualization­ individualistic idea  • It’s not only our internal drives that guide our behavior • Incentives: External stimuli ( vs internal drives) motivate behavior • E.g. food tastes good so eat though we aren’t hungry • Self regulation:  process ppl alter or change their behavoir to attain personal goals  • Ppl differ in self efficacy­ high means that your behavior has consequences towards the  outcomes that they are going to achieve  • Involves postponing short term rewards in pursuit of long term goals  • Is a “limited resource” • If used all up then we don’t really have control over behavior then need to wait for recovery of it • Like exercising  a muscle ▯ over time become fatigued but practice also build strengths,  therefore practice leads to better self regulation • Study: • Bring hungry participants  • Half of participants are allowed to eat the cookies as many as they want • The other half aren’t allowed to eat the cookies but the cookies are sitting there and are given  the option of turnips  • Self regulation required with veggies: behavior conflicts with the goal • Cookie = no self regulation= behavior matches goal • Independent variable= type of food eaten  • Dependent variable= time spent on an unsolvable puzzle task:  • Turnip eaters used up all of their self regulatory resources▯ spent less time on the puzzle than  everyone else  • Delayed Gratification: • Marshmallow Test : • Young children staring at a marshmallow  • If you wait for two minutes and you don’t eat the marshmallow then I’ll come back w two marshmallow  • Kids who were able to wait= have higher success rates in the future  • Trying to find ways to distract yourself to avoid eating the marshmallow • Strategies: turning hot into cold cognitions, ignoring, distraction: Eating: • What? • What you eat differs depending on cultural beliefs and personal experience  • Also religion  • Personal experience – habit of cooking certain meals  • When? • When you’re hungry, tasty, there’s food, meal time • Why? • Satiety centre “ stop, you’re full” • Feeding centre “ eat, you’re hungry” • In hypothalamus ▯ sends signals to tell the body to eat or to stop  • Hyperphagia ▯ damage to the satiety centre or ventral region▯ won’t stop eat  • Aphagia▯ lateral region damage▯ don’t eat unless is force fed • Pre frontal cortex important for this type of info for taste • Limbic system▯ things like the hippocampus, reward emotion system  • Leptin­ hormone release from fat travel to hypothalamus= inhibit eating behavior • Ghrelin= hormone from stomach that surge before eating and decrease after eating • Glucostatic theory▯ set glucose level in bloodstream • Lipostatic theory▯ set point for body fat  Dieting: • Body weight is regulated around a set point which is determined by genetic influence • Body responds to weight loss by slowing down metabolism • Bounce back and forth between deprivation and overeating can be particularly detrimental • Restrained eater= excessive eating in certain situation  • Eat according to rules rather than internal states  • Create their own set of rules that dictate when they eat and what they eat  • Broken the rule ▯ eating the whole bag. Box etc.  • How Much? • More variety= more eating  • Sensory specific satiety = eat the same thing= get sick of it ▯ given a different option ▯ go for it • Evolutionary advantage▯ prob can’t survive on one food only • Portion sizes ▯ dinner plates have gotten much larger▯ they give signals to how much we should be  eating  • Larger portions▯ more eating  Obesity: • Part genetics part behavior • Genetics determine whether a person can become obsess but environment determines whether that  person will become obese  Health and Well Being: 03/04/2014 • Health psych= focus on events that affect physical well being, applies psychological principles to the  understand of health and well being  • Biopsychosocial model: Psychological factors ( thoughts/actions, lifestyles, stress, health belief)▯ social conditions  • ( environments, cultural influences, family relationships, social support)▯ biological characteristics  ( genetic predispositions, exposure to germs, brain and other nervous system development)  • All of these things influence everything else  • Placebo effect: drug or treatment which is unrelated to the problem might make the person feel  better because the person believes the drug or treatment is effective • e.g. common knee surgery for osteoarthritis: thought that the surgery is a placebo effect because they  believe that the surgery will make them feel better • half of the participants go and get the surgery the other half a sham surgery (aka fake surgery they  don’t do the actual surgery ) • found that there was no difference between those got and those who didn’t get the surgery  Stress: • pattern of behavioral, psychological + physiological responses to events that match or exceed an  organism’s abilities to respond : • eustress vs distress  • distress= stress because of negative events • eustress= stress because of positive events  • Stressor: environmental event or stimulus that threatens an organism  • Major life stressors vs daily hassles • Major life stressors = big events that come along every now and then like moving • Daily hassles= happen every day that can add up to be very stressful  • Coping response: response an organism makes to avoid, escape from, or minimize an aversive  stimulus Physiology of stress: • HPA aka hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis : • Stressful events▯ brain▯ hypothalamus (chemical message)▯ pituitary gland ( hormones)▯  adrenal glands▯ cortisol ( stress hormone) Health and Well Being: 03/04/2014 • Chronic release of system­ detrimental ▯ things like memory loss  Sex differences: • Flight or fight response  Most research is done with male rats  • • Tend and befriend response  • Female tendency to respond to stress by protecting caring for their offspring as well as by  forming alliance with social groups • Oxytocin ▯ release to attachment with partner  • General adaptation syndrome: • Rats had the same response regardless of the stressor  • Alarm stage▯ first stage of stress response▯ getting ready to react to the even
More Less

Related notes for PSY100H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit