Class Notes (834,152)
Canada (508,380)
Psychology (3,518)
PSY100H1 (1,627)
Lecture

Chapter 6 notes.docx

8 Pages
80 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100H1
Professor
Denton Wagener
Semester
Spring

Description
CHAPTER 6 | Learning  Learning: An enduring change in behaviour resulting from experience It is a benefit from experience because it allows behaviour to be better adapted to the environment.  Watson believed that observable behaviour was the only valid indicator of psychological activity;  thoughts and beliefs could not be studied using scientific methods.  Locke’s tabula rasa = Infants are born knowing nothing and all knowledge is acquired through sensory  experiences     Conditioning   The essence of learning is understanding how events are related   Conditioning: A process in which environmental stimuli and behavioural responses become  connected  Classical (Pavlovian) conditioning  Occurs when we learn that two types of events go together (e.g., when we watch  a scary movie and our hearts beat faster)  Passive  Operant (Instrumental) conditioning  Occurs when we learn that a behaviour leads to a particular outcome (e.g.,  studying leads to better grades)  Active  Interest to B.F. Skinner Pavlov believed that conditioning is the basis for how animals learn to adapt to their environment. By  learning to predict what objects bring pleasure or pain, animals acquire new adaptive behaviours.  Classical Conditioning   A type of learning in which a neutral stimulus comes to elicit a reflexive response because it has  become associated with a stimulus that already produces that response  Unconditioned stimulus (US): A stimulus that elicits a response, such as a reflex, without any prior  learning  Unconditioned response (UR): A response that does not have to be learned, such as a reflex  Conditioned stimulus (CS): A stimulus that elicits a response only after learning has taken place  Conditioned response (CR): A response to a conditioned stimulus that has been learned   Weaker than the unconditioned response  Acquisition: The gradual formation of an association between the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli   Pavlov believed the critical element in the acquisition of a learned association is that the stimuli  occur together in time, a bond referred to as contiguity   The strongest conditioning actually occurs when there is a very brief delay between the CS and  the US Extinction: A process in which the conditioned response is weakened when the conditioned stimulus is  repeatedly presented without the unconditioned stimulus  Spontaneous recovery: A process in which a previously extinguished response re­emerges following  presentation of the conditioned stimulus  Stimulus generalization: Occurs when stimuli that are similar but not identical to the conditioned  stimulus produce the conditioned response  Stimulus discrimination: A differentiation between two similar stimuli when only one of them is  consistently associated with the unconditioned stimulus  Second­order conditioning: When something is consistently paired with the conditioned stimulus, without  the unconditioned stimulus, and leads to a conditioned response Phobias are acquired fears that are out of proportion to the real threat of the object or situation  Animals can be classically conditioned to fear neutral objects, a process known as fear  conditioning  Most important brain structure for fear conditioning is the amygdala   Counterconditioning; when people are exposed to a feared stimulus while engaging in a  pleasurable task  Systematic desensitization; imagining the feared object or situation while being taught how to  relax their muscles  The general idea is to break the CS­CR fear connection and develop a CS­CR relaxation  connection  Exposure to feared stimuli is more important than relaxation in breaking the fear  connection  Later developments  Some conditioned stimuli would be more likely to produce learning than others and that contiguity was is  not sufficient to create CS­US associations.  Not all CS­CR pairings are the same!   Some associations are easier to learn than others; some pairing of stimuli are more likely to  become associated than others  Conditioned food aversion: Associating a particular food with an unpleasant outcome (i.e., illness)  Can be formed in one trial, even if the illness doesn’t occur right away  Easily produced with smell or taste; more difficult to produce with light or sound  Biological preparedness: Refers to the idea that animals are genetically programmed to fear some objects  more than others  E.g., phobias about snakes and heights (more dangerous things) are more common than phobias  about squirrels and staplers (things that pose little threat)  The adaptive value of a particular response varies according to the animal’s evolutionary history. For  example, taste aversion are easy to condition in rats but difficult to condition in birds because in selection  food, rates rely more on taste whereas birds rely more on vision.  Differences in how females and males learn to navigate = Women will more likely use landmarks and  memorize a series of terms when navigating through space; males will more likely keep track of cardinal  directions.  Role of Cognition  Why is a slight delay between the CS and US optimal for learning?  In order for learning to take place, the CS must accurately predict the US   A stimulus that occurs before the US is more easily conditioned than one that  comes after it   The length of delay varies depending on the natures of the conditioned and  unconditioned stimuli   Rescorla­Wagner model  A cognitive model of classical conditioning which states that the strength of the CS­US  association is determined by the extent to which the US is unexpected or surprising   Because this leads to greater effort by the animal to understand why the US  appeared   Novel stimuli are more easily associated with the unconditioned stimulus than  are familiar stimuli  Once learned, a conditioned stimulus can prevent the acquisition of a new conditioned stimulus, a  phenomenon known as the blocking effect. A stimulus associated with a CS can act as an occasion setter, or trigger, for the CS.   Conditioned drug effects are common and demonstrate conditioning.  Tolerance effects are greatest when the drug is taken in the same location as previous drug use occurred in  because the body has learned to expect the drug in that location and thus compensates for the drug by  altering neurochemistry or physiology (Siegel).  Operant Conditioning   A learning process in which the consequences of an action determine the likelihood that it will be  performed in the future   Animals operate on their environments to produce effects  Thorndike’s law of effect  Any behaviour that leads to a “satisfying state of affairs” will more likely occur again,  and any behaviour that leads to an “annoying state of affairs” will less likely recur Reinforcer: A stimulus that follows a response and increases the likelihood that the response will be  repeated    Primary reinforcers are those that
More Less

Related notes for PSY100H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit