Class Notes (836,365)
Canada (509,756)
Biology (6,816)
Lecture

Lecture 1.docx

6 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
Biology 2382B
Professor
Robert Cumming
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 1: Introduction to Cell Biology Vinny Aggarwal What is cell biology? Cell biology is an academic discipline that studies cells, the basic structural, functional and biological unit of  all known organisms Cell biologists look at all aspects of the cell, including: cell structure cell organelles and membrane trafficking cell cycle, division, and death cell movement cell signaling cell communication Studying cells is important because: one of the core aspects of biology they are the fundamental unit of life there are still many unanswered questions about cells and how they work they are the storehouse for thousands of genes by studying what is ‘normal’, we can learn how to fix the ‘abnormal’ The ultimate goal of cell biology is to understand ‘what is a cell?’; that is, to understand how  macromolecular systems and organelles work and cooperate to enable cells to function autonomously and  in tissues Cells are studied using hypothesis­driven experiments Requires the tools and methods to conduct research and experiments Isolate and maintain cells in vitro (in a laboratory) Ability to view cells and know what to look for How to separate cell organelles Identify and study how proteins drive a biological cellular process Once we have the tools, we can begin to ask and answer biological questions Cell Culture Cell culture is the technique used to grow cells or tissues outside the organism under strictly controlled  conditions Cells are isolated from any tissue by breaking down the cell­to­cell and cell­matrix interactions Cells will clump together, so when you take cells from a tissue you need to break down the cell­to­cell  interactions Facilitated by proteins on the outside of the cell, called the extracellular matrix  can mechanically remove these proteins by taking a tissue and breaking it up (generally still need to do  more to fully remove the cell­to­cell interactions) can use the enzyme trypsin to cleave off the proteins on the exterior of cell membranes  can also add EDTA which removes metal cofactors required by the extracellular matrix proteins, and then  add enzyme to chew up the de­stabilized proteins Cells are supplied with proper nutrients (amino acids, minerals, vitamins, salts, glucose, etc), serum  (contains things like insulin and growth factors), and grown usually at 37 ° in a CO2 incubator; try to mimic  the in vivo  conditions serum is a blood product that doesn’t contain any cells, instead it contains other compounds in blood  required by cells insulin helps cells with glucose uptake serum also contains channels for glucose transport into the cell growth factors signals cells to stay alive and cues growth and division CO2 is infused into the incubator, since in the body the cellular atmosphere has a much higher CO2 content  compared to O2 these conditions essentially attempt to mimic the natural environment inside the body The medium for cell culture is stained with phenyl red, which appears red when t the proper pH Yellow indicates pH is too low Purple indicated pH is too high Cells can grow as adherent cell cultures (stick together using proteins) or suspension of cell cultures (in  liquid, can apply a dye to give color) In suspension, a magnetic stirrer is used to ensure that cells do not stick together and are equally aerated Contact inhibition occurs when cells grow and divide until they are so closely packed that they are unable to  divide Forms a confluent monolayer on the petri dish   Primary cell culture refers to cells taken directly from an organism undergo contact inhibition if cell density is high can add trypsin to break cells apart, and then dilute, suspend and re­plate cells to restart the process of  growing and dividing these cells usually divide a limited number of times (~50 generations – called the Hayflick limit) each generation refers to a dilution, suspension, re­plate cycle Cell line refers to cells which are transformed and are able to grow indefinitely less likely to exhibit contact inhibition also known as immortal cells; often can lead to tumor growth cells lose the regulatory mechanism to limit cell division and triggers for cell death the first human cell line, called HeLa, was established from cervical carcinoma biopsy and served a crucial  role in the understanding many aspects of cell biology related to tumor development, cell growth and  replication, etc Normal vs Transformed Cells Normal fibroblasts Appear elongated Are aligned and orderly packed Grow in parallel arrays Exhib
More Less

Related notes for Biology 2382B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit