Information Overload.docx

15 Pages
67 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Media, Information and Technoculture
Course
Media, Information and Technoculture 2200F/G
Professor
Kane Faucher
Semester
Fall

Description
Information Overload  01/30/2012 * Information is very social  * The extent to which our devices are determing our lives, as opposed to us determining our lives  * Amount of information we supply to the internet is infinite; fluid; dynamic; always in motion ▯ Term coined by Alvin Toffler (1970) ▯ “Information Asphyxiation” threatens our processing efficiency ▯ David Shenk’s IO symptoms: increased stress, strained vision, confusion, frustration, impaired judgment,  impatience/ hostility in online/offline interactions in response to input glut ▯ Perpetually Plugged­in?  ▯ Rapid cycle of innovation  ~ Total Sum of Information From Year 0 to Present ~ ▯ 0­1989 = 2.4% ▯ 1989 –present = 98% Information Facts ▯ Population of world est. 7 billion (2011) ▯ Average production of digital information per person = 800 MB ▯ 800 MB = 25 volumes of an encyclopedia ▯ Information overload? ▯ 427.2 = Average amount of mouse clicks per person, per day ▯ 12 = Average number of hours per person spent in front of a screen  * Midterm = how you connect things together *  Information Revolutions  01/30/2012 ▯ Printing Press (~1450) ▯ Scientific (~1500) ▯ Religious (~1500) ▯ Industrial (~1750) ▯ Darwin (1860s) ▯ Freud (1920s) ▯ Information (First wave: 1940s) Foundation of All Knowledge ▯ 1405: All knowledge is coming from the bible or Aristotle  ▯ The whole knowledge economy was controlled by the 10% of European population who was literate Information Revolutions  01/30/2012 ▯ All information was guarded by the Church; knowledge is power  ▯ All you needed to know as a peasant was told to you by the priest on Sunday from the bible Your days are filled with working, what do you need to know?  ▯ Only the wealth church could afford to purchase books  ▯ Before 1450, a book was a real investment; would cost you more than a BMW  ▯ 8 cows = 1 400 pages book; written by hand  Scribal Labour ▯ Somebody had to be paid to copy out a book; materials to buy; rubicators (pictures); someone to cut and  bind a book  ▯ Working under very difficult conditions; no heating or A/C; poor lighting; mistakes can occur  ▯ Some scribes decided to make editorial changes to the text (no one will know)  ▯ You will only be bankrolled if you write religious text; no money to write your autobiography Information Revolutions  01/30/2012 Marginalia ▯ no such thing as book publishing in the middle ages; books for the clergy alone ▯ Those who could not publish would write notes in the margin as commentary on the book  ▯ Marginalia= ‘stuff written in the margins’ Middle Ages = if notes written in the margins were good they were sometimes compiled into their own book  Marginalia Now  ▯ Food For Thought: as contributors in comment culture, we provide billions of comments to blogs, news  sites stores, reviews of books and movies, etc., every year. That is considered marginalia ▯ Digital margins are infinite Pictorial Information  ▯ items such as stained glass windows have a purpose in story telling  made for those who could not ready ▯ Church had monopoly over information  Information Revolutions  01/30/2012 they had the literacy skills; they had the money ▯ Relying on copying the information heightens probability for error ▯ Most popular book and commentary = the Bible   ▯ All books were written in Latin  Gutenberg ▯ Goldsmith and entrepenuer  ▯ 1400s = translation of books into language people could understand  ▯ 1450 = produced first book not copied by hand ▯ Sparks both the protestant and scientific revolution Advantages of Print  1. Information could be transmitted faster  Information Revolutions  01/30/2012 2. More people could gain access to information  3. More discussion of ideas and , increased literacy  4. More criticism of the ruling elite 5.  Authors become important; before the authors name was unimportant; not author becomes celebrity 6. Authors could express their own ideas and not just copy information  7. Authors could become popular because their work could reach more people  8. Spelling and the alphabet across languages could be standardized and not just guess work  9. Due to higher production with an easier method, this meant costs would come down, which means that  more people could afford books, which thus compelled more of them to become literate 10. And, most importantly, it meant the Ch
More Less

Related notes for Media, Information and Technoculture 2200F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit