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Lecture

week 8-Community Corrections lecture notes

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Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2253A/B
Professor
Jennifer Silcox
Semester
Fall

Description
Community Corrections  Community corrections: sanctions and interventions used by the criminal justice system to respond to/prevent criminal behaviour.  Gradual release programs (halfway houses, parole) are designed to assist in crime reduction, community safety, and the safe reintegration of offenders returning to the community  Are community sanctions a good idea? What are some of the benefits of community sanctions? Community corrections: work with people at risk and are involved example: the boys and girls club helping people who are potentially at risk of getting into risky behavior or involved with the criminal justice system they differ from GRP by assisting members for making better choices more of a prevention before committing crime or getting involved with CJS What do you think? • Community-Based Corrections:  Do you think that all persons convicted of a crime should serve a portion of their sentence in an institution?  Identify and discuss three reasons why community-based corrections should be used more extensively in Canada than they are currently  Identify and discuss three reasons why community-based corrections should not be used more extensively in Canada Benefits of Community Corrections  less money spent on incarcerations  fills gap between jail and probation  better for coming back to the community  program helps reintegrate you into community  house arrest is a component  or other community service  less likely to reoffend in their community if actively participating in it  wanted to cut down on daytime crime in school  put together case management program by interviewing criminals first and put them in appropriate programs  it is effective because it is dynamic  they are looking at the things they can change  most arrests are substance abuse which mostly go through community corrections Probation • What is the idea that probation is based upon? • The maximum length of probation is 3 years. Unless high risk offender it is 10 • What is the maximum length of probation for high-risk offenders? 10 • Also called ‘super probation’ (Bill C-41) for dangerous offenders. • How common is the sentence of probation used in Canada? In 2010-2011, 45% of all guilty cases received probation either on its own or in combination with other sentences. - Probation and parole are two different things - Based on the idea that not all offenders are dangerous to the community - Involves releasing this individual into the community under provincial supervision - Granted at sentencing - Sometimes combined with other sentences - Super probation is when judge would determine if it is a dangerous offender and this person is placed under supervision Probation • Judges consider three factors: 1. Nature: was it a violent offence or a petty offence 2. Risk: does this person pose risk to community 3. Circumstances: ex substance abuse, was the crime instigated by substance abuse • Conditions of Probation: no fire arms, report to probation officer, report if they get a new job or move, required to stay away from criminal associates and drugs. • Some conditional ones may be that they have to take part in anger management programs or other rehab programs 4. Individuals must abide by a set of mandatory obligations and may be subject to a variety of optional conditions. - Probation officer determines whether the probation terms are violated and asses what to do when there is a breach in probation Eligibility for Probation  In Canada, the majority of the offenders of violent crimes are given probation because:  Less serious;  Offender’s criminal record  For what type of offences is probation less likely to be used with?  What do studies of probation orders indicate about the
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