Class Notes (836,365)
Canada (509,756)
Sociology (3,242)
Laura Huey (18)
Lecture

lecture2

4 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2253A/B
Professor
Laura Huey
Semester
Spring

Description
Lecture Two ▯Police: Organization and Powers Structure of Canadian policing (4 tiered system) • Federal force o RCMP responsible to the solicitor­general of Canada under the RCMP Act for  enforcement of federal statutes such as the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act,  the Securities Act; don’t usually investigate Criminal Code violations, but may be  asked to; also responsible for national security issues (such as protecting foreign  dignitaries and/or high­ranking public officials) • Provincial forces enforce both Criminal Code and Provincial Offences o RCMP (under contract to the province) ▯ their role remains defined under the  RCMP act, but they are responsible to both the solicitor­general and the province  to which they are contracting for  Ensuring public safety and crime prevention for unincorporated areas (ie.  Highways and lands outside of municipalities)  They also work as an information clearinghouse and provide assistance  to municipal forces on issues relating to: electronic crime, organized  crime, crime detection laboratories, CPIC or the Canadian Police  Information Center, and the Canadfian Police College o Provincial forces (OPP, etc) responsibilities same as above • Municipal forces o Responsible for: enforcement of criminal code offences, provincial quasi­ offences, and municipal by­law infractions  o RCMP or provincial force (under contract to a municipality, eg. Burnaby or  Surrey)  o Municipal force ▯ include independent city forces such as the London Police, the  Toronto Police Service and the Vancouver Police Department or regional forces  composed of multiple jurisdiction banned together (Peel Regional Police in  Ontario) • Aboriginal police forces o Are essentially treated as municipal forces; accountability structure us  same/similar to that of a municipal force (local control); enforcement of federal,  provincial and municipal offences Police Duties • Principal duties: o Preserving the peace o Preventing crimes and other offences o Assisting victims of crime o The investigation of crimes o The apprehension of criminals o Recommending charges and participating in prosecutions o Executing warrants • However, as a 24­hour service provider, they are called upon to do much more than this.  Provide some examples (taking people to find shelter, kids back on buses, settling  disputes, helping lost people) Police Powers • The power to invoke the law, through a range of sanctions from issuing tickets to  effecting an arrest ▯ a form of coercion in and of itself, coupled with the ability to use  force in effecting a resolution, is said to define the police institution, and separate its  practitioners from others who are similarily tasked with dealing with society’s problems Power of Arrest ▯generally covered under section 495 of the Criminal Code •  Types of arrest (outlined under the CCC and in other pieces of federal legislation) • Warrantless o Where an officer has reasonable grounds to believe that an individual(s) has  committed an indictable offence or is about to commit one (except s.553  offences ▯ the lowest level of indictable offences, tried by a provincial court judge   only. Eg. Obtaining money or property by false pretenses; keeping a bawdy  house/betting house, etc) o Where an officer finds someone committing any criminal offence (indictable,  summary or hybrid) o Where an officer has reasonable grounds to believe that a warrant of arrest or  criminal committal (a document issued by a judge directing corrections officials  to receive someone into custody upon sentencing; or where an individual’s parole  has been revoked) is in force within the jurisdiction in which an individual is  found o Two additional conditions on the power of arrest:  The officer must have reasonable grounds to believe that the person is  not likely to appear in court of their own accord  The officer must have reasonable grounds to believe that an arrest is  ‘necessary to the public interest’ because • There is a need to establish an individual’s identity • There is a need to secure or preserve evidence relating to the  offence • To prevent the continuation or repetition of the crime or another  offence •
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2253A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit