Class Notes (837,550)
Canada (510,314)
York University (35,409)
KINE 2031 (127)
Neil Smith (92)
Lecture

Psychology 1010– Jan 6.docx

9 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology & Health Science
Course
KINE 2031
Professor
Neil Smith
Semester
Fall

Description
Psychology – Jan 6 ­Behaviouralistic approach: ­concentrates on overt behaviour ­stress an SR relationship  ­doesn’t acknowledge the thinking power and cognition  ­Cognitive approach: ­stresses importance of SOR relationship  ­S  ▯interpret, evaluate, predict, expectations  ▯R ­Kohler argued that our experiences are organized, its not just trial and error; we will  eventually gain insight ­sudden understanding of how to solve a problem  ­Information processing approach to memory  ­stimulus  ▯processing (memory system)  ▯recall or retrieval  ­stimulus  ▯sensory store ­sensory store preserves info in its original sensory form for a short time; the sensation of  the stimulus lingers briefly after the stimulus has ended  ­2 things are needed for info to go from the sensory to the short term memory (STM)  1) attention 2) pattern recognition  ­decay – info that fades away with the passage of time ­STM – “working memory” ­can hold info for about 15­20 seconds ­has limited capacity and can only hold 7+ or ­2  ­buffer system  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ­chunking  ­a chunk – a meaningful unit of info  ­how we memorize? ­chunking ­repitition ­categorizing ­visualizing  ­elaborate rehearsal – try to form associations  ­long term memory (LTM) – has an unlimited capacity  ­info is stored indefinitely or permanently  ­evidence: 1) flashbulb memories        2) age­regression through hypnosis  ­Serial position effect –  Jan 13 ­storage in LTM  ­procedural memory­ memory for how to do things; memory of actions and skills  ­semantic memory involves general info about rules and things that we have over  learned; we cannot remember the exact time we have required this memory   ­episodic memory – involves memory for specific words; these are usually unique events  rather repeated ones  ­implicit memory (incidental) – you unconsciously learn something  ­explicit memory –  ­inability to recall: 1) the indo never entered the memory system in the first place (pseudo forgetting) 2) decay or displaced 3) info is available but not accessible ­Why info is sometimes not accessible? 1) encoding specificity principle or context dependent forgetting ­not being able to recall because the cues used for retrieving info are different  from those used at encoding  ­you are using an inappropriate search strategy  ­State dependent forgetting: ­one’s mood or physical state is different at encoding and retrieval  2) interference (competition from other material) ­forgetting from LTM is influenced by the amount, complexity, and type of info  encountered in the retention interval I) retroactive interference – new or recently acquired info interferes with the recall  of previously learned (old) info  II) proactive interference – older info interferes with the recall of newer  information  ­Depth of processing approach to memory  Level 1 : appearance – structured encoding Level 2: sound – phonemic  Level 3 : meaning – semantic  ­Memory in natural contexts: ­can involve 1) construction: we add to information stored in memory; the process that helps us  construct these memories is inference  ­inference: the process by which we fill in missing info  2) distortion 3) people remember themes more when in info fits in with their already established  schema ­schema: knowledge of an object or an event based on past experiences; we are more  likely to recall things that are consistent with our schema  ­*CHAPTER 8 WILL NOT BE LECTURED ON BUT WILL BE TESTED ­Chapter 10: ­motivation is made up of: 1) drive or arousal 2) goal directed behaviour  Theories of motivation: 1) Freud’s notion of life + death instincts 2)  sociobiological view  3) instincts  4) Hull’s Drive Reduction Theory  ­E = D x H Drive x Habit Strength  ­when we have a certain drive we do certain behaviours that well serve our drive ­biological needs or deficiencies increase our level of drive ­all of our behaviour is geared toward satisfying this need & reducing drive to “0”  ­Incentive­ anticipated reward; are learned  ­drive theories: how internal states “push” ­incentive theories: extends “pull” 5) Hebb’s Optimal level of arousal theory:  ­we are motivated to attain an optimal level of arousal (happy median) ­when arousal is too low or too high we’re motivated to bring it to an optimal level  according to Eysenck: ­introverts: have biological high resting level of arousal ­extroverts: have a low resting level of arousal  ­RAS – reticular ­* short answer*  ­1) Soloman’s Opponent Process Theory:  ­opponent refers to opposite ­if there is too much of a swing of one pole of emotion, the opponent process kicks in; a  negative emotion will trigger a positive emotion and vise versa  ­net effect is that the emotion will be satisfied  6) Zukerman’s Sensation – Seeking Theory  ­theory is biological  ­believed that people who have a low resting level of arousal are high sensation seekers  ­people who have high resting level of arousal choose not to seek stimulation  ­Characteristics of high sensation seekers 1) thrill + adventurous seeking  2) tend to be experience seekers 3) dis
More Less

Related notes for KINE 2031

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit