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FSCN 3615 (27)
Lecture 7

FSCN 3615 Lecture 7: February 20-2
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3 Pages
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Department
Food Science and Nutrition
Course Code
FSCN 3615
Professor
Cherry Smith

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Traditional Japanese Cuisine
Mochi
Japanese rice cakes made from short-grain rice flour
Eaten year round as desert, and it is a traditional food for the Japanese New Year
“Designed to be eaten with the eyes”
Japanese come to America
1890- immigration to the USA
Settled in Hawaii and the West Cost
Early employment: the railroads, canneries and in agriculture
Lots of discrimination against the Japanese, in 1924, the Immigration Exclusion Act halted
Japanese immigration completely
Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7th, 1941- a day President Franklin Roosevelt said “a
day which will live in infamy”
2,300 Americans were killed
Next day, December 8th, America declared war on Japan
World War II: Japanese were put in war relocation camps
February 19th, 1942- Roosevelt signed executive order to round up 127,000 people of Japanese descent
living in the US to be removed from their homes to place in internment camps
3,600 Japanese men entered the US armed forces
1946: camps closed
1948: Japanese were awarded $20,000 for property loss
Hiroshima and the end of the war
Japanese Today:
1 million Japanese live in US
Japanese Americans tend to live in culturally diverse neighborhoods
They wanted not to be isolated so after the war they dispersed
Family incomes are above the national average
Education is valued!
Most adults (88%) have attended college and hold professional jobs
Japanese Worldview:
Religion
Buddhist (primary)
Christian
Shinto, indigenous religion of Japan:
Believe that humans are inherently good
Evil is caused by pollution/filthiness
Shinto deities (Kami) represent any form of existence (human, plant, animal)
Family
Family connection is very strong
KoKo: children are expected to care for their parents in their old age
Gaman: belief that is virtuous to suppress emotions- self-control is paramount
Haji: belief that one should not bring shame to self, their family or their community
Enryo: the belief that one must be polite and show respect
Japanese Food Habits
Should include “something from the mountains and something from the sea”
Rice and fish/ seafood
Chinese influence on the Japanese cuisine was very strong
3rd century- rice cultivation was brought to Japan from China
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Description
Traditional Japanese Cuisine Mochi Japanese rice cakes made from short-grain rice flour Eaten year round as desert, and it is a traditional food for the Japanese New Year Designed to be eaten with the eyes Japanese come to America 1890- immigration to the USA Settled in Hawaii and the West Cost Early employment: the railroads, canneries and in agriculture Lots of discrimination against the Japanese, in 1924, the Immigration Exclusion Act halted Japanese immigration completely Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7th, 1941- a day President Franklin Roosevelt said a day which will live in infamy 2,300 Americans were killed Next day, December 8th, America declared war on Japan World War II: Japanese were put in war relocation camps February 19th, 1942- Roosevelt signed executive order to round up 127,000 people of Japanese descent living in the US to be removed from their homes to place in internment camps 3,600 Japanese men entered the US armed forces 1946: camps closed 1948: Japanese were awarded $20,000 for property loss Hiroshima and the end of the war Japanese Today: 1 million Japanese live in US Japanese Americans tend to live in culturally diverse neighborhoods They wanted not to be isolated so after the war they dispersed Family incomes are above the national average Education is valued! Most adults (88%) have attended college and hold professional jobs Japanese Worldview: Religion Buddhist (primary) Christian Shinto, indigenous religion of Japan: Believe that humans are inherently good Evil is caused by pollution/filthiness Shinto deities (Kami) represent any form of existence (human, plant, animal) Family Family connection is very strong KoKo: children are expected to care for their parents in their old age Gaman: belief that is virtuous to suppress emotions- self-control is paramount Haji: belief that one should not bring shame to self, their family or their community Enryo: the belief that one must be polite and show respect Japanese Food Habits Should include something from the mountains and something from the sea Rice and fish/ seafood Chinese influence on the Japanese cuisine was very strong 3rd century- rice cultivation was brought to Japan from China
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