SOCA03Y3

Introduction to Sociology

University of Toronto Scarborough

This foundational skills course, which is taught over two full terms, provides a comprehensive introduction to the discipline of sociology beginning with how sociologists use theory and research methods to understand the social world. Topics covered will include culture, inequality, gender, sexualities, race and ethnicity, families, education, religion, crime, law, health, political economy, mass media, social change, and globalization.
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Lawrence Sawchuk

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SOCA03Y3 Lecture Notes - Fall 2018, Lecture 9 - Social Inequality, Ascribed Status, Social Stratification
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Sociology
SOCA03Y3
Lawrence Sawchuk
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Sociology
SOCA03Y3
Lawrence Sawchuk

SOCA03Y3 Syllabus for Lawrence Sawchuk — Fall 2018

1
University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology
SOCA03Y
Introduction to Sociology
Section 01: Mondays 2:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m., AC 223
Section 02: Tuesdays 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m., AA 112
Instructor: Williams, Lawrence
Office location: MW320
Email address: Lawrence.Willi[email protected]
Office hours: Mondays 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. and Tuesdays 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Course web site: q.utoronto.ca (Quercus)
The SOCA03 Team:
Jason Pagaduan, Lead TA
Tutorial TA names and contact information
will be posted on Quercus.
Andrew Situ, Peer Mentor
Sarah Cox, Peer Mentor
Getting Started:
Syllabus:
Read the Syllabus completely. Your
continued enrollment in this course
indicates that you understand the
requirements for the course and
agree to abide by its policies.
Textbook:
Visit the UTSC Bookstore to get
your e-textbook access code. Use
the detailed instructions on page 8
to log-in and begin!
Quercus:
Log into your Quercus account and
familiarize yourself with our page.
Be sure to check it regularly.
Tutorials:
You must register for a one-hour
tutorial slot in addition to lecture.
Some Guiding Questions in this Course:
What is the sociological imagination?
How does theory help us understand the
social world?
How do sociologists conduct research?
Why does culture matter?
How and why does social inequality persist
How does sociology explain education,
families, work, and religion?
Under what conditions does social change
occur?
How do mass media shape social
relationships?
How does globalization impact societies
and the environment?
2
Classroom Policies
Mutual respect is critical for learning and teaching. Let’s work together to make that
happen. Specifically:
QUIETNESS:
Noise is distracting to both me and to your classmates. Please mute any devices that
ring or beep – and don’t carry on private conversations. In a classroom like this, even
whispers can be very distracting to others!
TECHNOLOGY:
In this class, you are permitted to use devises only for course-related purposes, such
as note-taking or participating in specific classroom activities. It is very distracting
both to your classmates and to me if you are watching a video or posting on
Facebook.
TIMELINESS:
Please be prepared to stay for the full duration of the class. If you are late, enter
quietly and get settled quickly. If you must leave early, try to sit on the end of a row
near an exit to minimize disruption.
SNACKS:
If you need to have a snack or a beverage in class, please do so quietly and
considerately.
CONTROVERSY:
We will sometimes encounter controversial topics. Please practice compassionate
honesty and respectful disagreement.
3
Questions?
FIRST STOP!
Before you do anything else, LOOK IN THE SYLLABUS and on Quercus Discussion
Board FAQ. If your question is not answered there, then:
TECHNICAL ISSUES WITH REVEL (e.g., trouble logging in, account problems, etc.):
If not answered on the syllabus or Quercus, you may ask your peer mentors Andrew
Situ at [email protected] or Sarah Cox at sarahann.co[email protected].
You may also contact REVEL technical support at
https://www.pearsonhighered.com/revel/students/support/
EXTENSIONS ON REVEL HOMEWORK, ASSIGNMENTS, OR TERM TESTS DUE TO
ILLESS OR EMERGENCY:
Email our Lead T.A., Jason Pagaduan, Ja[email protected], BEFORE
the deadline.
QUESTIONS ABOUT TEXTBOOK AND LECTURE CONTENT:
Email or ask your tutorial TA, post a question on the discussion board, come to my
office hours, or email me.
QUESTIONS ABOUT ADJUSTING TO UTSC, STUDY SKILLS, HOW TO IMPROVE
YOUR MARKS, or MAJORING IN SOCIOLOGY:
Your first stop should be your Peer Mentors, Andrew Situ at
[email protected] or Sarah Cox at [email protected]. They
will also be available at each lecture and will hold drop-in hours.
HELPING EACH OTHER:
If a classmate posts a question on Quercus and you know the answer, please share it!
4
Email Etiquette
The University requires that we conduct all student correspondence using official
University of Toronto email addresses. Please be sure to email from your University
account.
In the subject line, put your course number, tutorial section, and brief subject line
(e.g., SOCA03, Tutorial 2, question about Marx”).
In general, you can address all of us by our firs names. If you aren’t comfortable
calling me Lawrence, Please use Instructor Williams.
Politeness, respect, and gratitude are appreciated!
RESPONSE TIME: We strive to respond to student emails and postings on the
discussion board within 48 hours on weekdays. This may be delayed on weekends
and holidays.
5
Evaluation Components at a Glance
Type
Description
Weight
Revel Quizzes
Complete quizzes in the e-text on a
weekly basis before lecture each week
starting on week 2
Ongoing
10%
Tutorials
Attend and participate in 11 tutorials
throughout the year
Ongoing
10%
Assignment 1
Apply classical and contemporary
sociological theories to a current event.
1000-1500 words.
Before
Lecture on
Week 6
10%
Test 1
This test will cover lecture materials and
readings from Class 1 to Class 7. It will
consist of multiple choice and short
answer questions.
TBA/Week
8
10%
Assignment 2
Conduct a literature review. 1000-1500
words.
Before
Lecture on
Week 13
10%
Test 2
Cumulative and will consist of multiple
choice and short answer questions
TBA/Week
16
15%
Assignment 3
Research Project based on interviews that
you conduct. 2000 words maximum
Before
Lecture on
Week 22
10%
Final Exam
Cumulative and will consist of multiple
choice and short answer questions
TBA/April
Exam
Period
25%
6
Grading and Submission Policies
Revel Quizzes Ongoing. 10%
DUE: Before each class, as listed on the schedule.
Your e-textbook uses an interactive system called REVEL. As you read, you will
complete open-book quizzes.
QUIZZES: Worth 3 points per question. You are allowed 3 attempts at each question
and lose 1 point per incorrect attempt.
JOURNAL ENTRIES: These are not required and are not marked. You may find them
helpful for notetaking and studying.
LATE POLICY: Late homework will be accepted only in the case of illness or personal
emergency. You must request an extension from our Lead T.A. Jason Pagaduan,
BEFURE the deadline. Depending on the circumstances, we may request
documentation.
Tutorials Ongoing. 10%
You must register for a tutorial section in addition to your lecture.
These small sections (maximum of 35 students in each) provide additional material,
opportunities to practice writing skills, and discussion questions.
You will be marked based on your attendance and level of participation.
Please attend only the tutorial in which you are registered. Tutorials do not meet
every week. Please see the schedule for the weeks when tutorials will be held.
ABSENCES: If you will miss a tutorial due to illness or personal emergency, you must
contact your Tutorial TA BEFORE your tutorial. You may be able to attend a different
tutorial led by your TA during the same week OR you may receive partial credit for up
to two excused absences per year.
7
Writing Assignments. 30% Total
#1 DUE: Before class in Week 6 (10%)
#2 DUE: Before class in Week 13 (10%)
#3 DUE: Before class in Week 22 (10%0
Submit assignments on Quercus. They will automatically be uploaded to Turnitin
when the assignment is uploaded.
Detailed instructions for each written assignment will be reviewed during your
tutorials.
LATE POLICY: Late assignments that are unexcused will receive a 5% penalty per day
and will not be accepted more than 7 days late.
If your assignment will be late due to illness or personal emergency, you must request
an extension from our Lead T.A., Jason Pagaduan, BEFORE the deadline. Depending
on the circumstances, we may request documentation.
Tests and Final Exam. 50% Total
Test 1: TBA/Week 8 (10%)
Test 2: TBA/Week 16 (15%)
Final Exam: TBA/April (25%)
Your two tests will be given outside of class and your final exam will be held during
the exam period in April. Times and locations for all will be announced as soon as
they have been assigned by the Registrar’s Office.
All are cumulative and will contain multiple choice and short-answer questions. Study
guides will be provided. SOS (Students of Sociology) also typically offers review
sessions.
TEST 1 and 2 LATE POLICY: If an emergency keeps you from attending Test 1 or 2,
you MUST notify our Lead T.A., Jason Pagaduan, BEFORE the test. One makeup test
(with different questions) will be scheduled within a week of the original test. Bring
documentation for your absence to the makeup.
U. of T. FINAL EXAM LATE POLICY: Within 72 hours of the exam, you must petition
the Registrar for a deferral. This involves a $70 fee and proper documentation. If
approved, you take the exam during the NEXT exam period.
8
Course Textbook
Ravelli, Bruce, and Michelle Webber. 2018. Exploring Sociology: A Canadian
Perspective. Revel Access Card.
*The e-text is available at the UTSC bookstore, and you may also purchase a loose-
leaf paper copy of the text for $15 within 2 weeks of your purchase after enrolling
the course on the Pearson website (see below).
TECHNICAL SUPPORT:
https://www.pearsonhighered.com/revel/students/support
SET-UP INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Purchase your access card at the UTSC bookstore.
2. Go to the appropriate link below (Chrome, Firefox, or Safari are
recommended):
MONDAY SECTION: https://console.pearson.com/enrollment/y3esly
TUESDAY SECTION: https://console.pearson.com/enrollment/b0neiy
3. If this is your first Person digital product, create a new Pearson account. BE
SURE TO USE THE SAME FIRST AND LAST NAME THAT YOU ARE
REGISTERED UNDER UTSC. If you have an existing account, sign in with your
username and password.
4. Choose your course under “My Courses” and redeem the access code that
you got from the UTSC Bookstore.
5. Bookmark https://console.pearson.com to easily access your materials.
9
Other Policies
MISSED LECTURES
I do not take attendance, however you are strongly encouraged to attend each
class. The material presented will expand on what you read in the textbook – it does
not duplicate it. You will also miss class discussions, activities, and guest speakers.
Tests and the final exam cover the lecture material (including any films and guest
speakers), tutorial material, and the readings.
LECTURE SLIDES
I will typically post lecture slides on the morning of each class. They are provided
for those of you who like to know what’s ahead and who find it helpful to take notes
directly on the slides. They do not contain a verbatim transcript of what will be said
in class. Typically, they will contain an outline of the day’s topics, keywords, links to
relevant material, and images.
RE-EVALUATION REQUESTS
Your TAs and I spend a lot of time carefully evaluating your work. On occasion, we
may make an error. If you feel that your work was mismarked, please follow these
steps:
1. Wait 24 hours after receiving your mark. We require this because sometimes
what you think is an error at first makes more sense after you have slept on it.
2. Write a 1-2 paragraph explanation of why you feel that an error was made
and request that it be reviewed.
3. Email this explanation to your TA within one week of receiving your original
mark. If appropriate and available, attach any related documents or
screenshots.
4. Be aware that if you request a re-evaluation, the entire assignment will be re-
evaluated. Your mark may go up, down, or remain the same.
5. If you are not satisfied with the response you receive from your Tutorial TA,
you may email me directly or visit me during office hours. Please send or
bring all relevant material.
10
COURSE SCHEDULE
(Please note that there is NO CLASS for the Tuesday section on
September 4; the course begins on Sept. 10 for the Monday
Section and Sept. 11 for the Tuesday Section)
Week #
Mon
Lecture
Tues
Lecture
Tutorial
Week?
Topic
What’s due BEFORE your
lecture meets this week?
1
Sept 10
Sept 11
No
Introduction
Read Syllabus
2
Sept 17
Sept 18
Yes
Understanding the
Sociological
Imagination
Read Preface and Chapter 1
Complete REVEL homework
3
Sept 24
Sept 25
No
Classical Social
Theories
Read Chapter 2
Complete REVEL homework
4
Oct 1
Oct 2
Yes
Contemporary Social
Theories
Read Chapter 3
Complete REVEL homework
NO CLASS OCT 8 and OCT 9 STUDY BREAK
5
Oct 15
Oct 16
No
Research,
Methodology and
Ethics
Read Chapter 4
Complete REVEL homework
6
Oct 22
Oct 23
Yes
Culture
Read Chapter 5
Complete REVEL homework
ASSIGNMENT #1 DUE
7
Oct 29
Oct 30
No
Socialization and Social
Interaction
Read Chapter 6
Complete REVEL homework
8
Week of Nov 5: TEST 1 will be held outside of class time. Date, time, and rooms will be
announced as soon as they are provided by the Registrar’s Office.
9
Nov 12
Nov 13
Yes
Social Inequality
Read Chapter 7
Complete REVEL homework
10
Nov 19
Nov 20
No
Gender
Read Chapter 8
Complete REVEL homework
11
Nov 26
Nov 27
Yes
Sexualities
Read Chapter 9
Complete REVEL homework
CLASS RESUMES on JANUARY 7 (Monday Section) and JANUARY 8 (Tuesday Section).
12
Jan 7
Jan 8
Yes
Race and Racialization
Read Chapter 10
Complete REVEL homework
13
Jan 14
Jan 15
No
Families
Read Chapter 11
Complete REVEL homework
ASSIGNMENT #2 DUE
11
14
Jan 21
Jan 22
Yes
Education
Read Chapter 12
Complete REVEL homework
15
Jan 28
Jan 29
No
Religion
Read Chapter 13
Complete REVEL homework
16
Week of Feb 4: TEST 2 will be held outside of class time. Date, time, and rooms will be
announced as soon as they are provided by the Registrar’s Office.
17
Feb 11
Feb 12
Yes
Crime, Law, and
Regulation
Read Chapter 14
Complete REVEL homework
NO CLASS FEB 18 and FEB 19 STUDY BREAK
18
Feb 25
Feb 26
No
Health, Aging, and
Disabilities
Read Chapter 15
Complete REVEL homework
19
Mar 4
Mar 5
Yes
Work and the Political
Economy
Read Chapter 16
Complete REVEL homework
20
Mar 11
Mar 2
No
Media
Read Chapter 17
Complete REVEL homework
21
Mar 18
Mar 19
Yes
Social Change,
Collective Behaviour,
and Social Movements
Read Chapter 18
Complete REVEL homework
22
Mar 25
Mar 26
No
Globalization
Read Chapter 19
Complete REVEL homework
ASSIGNMENT #3 DUE
23
Apr 1
Apr 2
Yes
Challenges to the
Global Environment
Read Chapter 20
Complete REVEL homework
FINAL EXAM will be held during the UTSC exam period (April 10 to April 27). Date, time, and
rooms will be announced as soon as they are provided by the Registrar’s Office.
12
Turnitin.com
Papers are to be submitted at the beginning of the class on the due date on Quercus.
Papers will be automatically uploaded to Turnitin.com with no action required by you.
“ Students agree that by taking this course all required papers may be subject to
submission for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of
plagiarism. All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the
Turnitin.com reference database solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of
such papers. The terms that apply to the University’s use of the Turnitin.com
service are described on the Turnitin.com web site.”
Assignments not submitted through Turnitin will receive a grade of zero (0 %) unless a
student instead provides, along with their essay, sufficient secondary material (e.g.,
reading notes, outlines of the paper, rough drafts of the final draft, etc.) to establish that
the paper they submit is truly their own. The alternative (not submitting via Turnitin) is in
place because, strictly speaking, using Turnitin is voluntary for students at the University
of Toronto.
Conditions of Use
"Normally, students will be required to submit their course essays to Turnitin.com for a review of
textual similarity and detection of possible plagiarism. In doing so, students will allow their essays
to be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database, where they will be
used solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. The terms that apply to the University's use of
the Turnitin.com service are described on the Turnitin.com web site”.
Click here for information surrounding the issues of Canadian copyright and privacy laws.
Accessibility Statement:
Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In particular, if you
have a disability/health consideration that may require accommodations, please feel free to
approach me and/or the AccessAbility Services Office as soon as possible. I will work with you
and AccessAbility Services to ensure you can achieve your learning goals in this course.
Enquiries are confidential. The UTSC AccessAbility Services staff (located in S302) are
available by appointment to assess specific needs, provide referrals and arrange appropriate
accommodations (416) 287-7560 or [email protected].
13
Academic Integrity
Academic integrity is essential to the pursuit of learning and scholarship in a university, and to
ensuring that a degree from the University of Toronto is a strong signal of each student’s
individual academic achievement. As a result, the University treats cases of cheating and
plagiarism very seriously. The University of Toronto’s Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters
(http://www.governingcouncil. utoronto.ca/policies/behaveac.htm) outlines the behaviours that
constitute academic dishonesty and the processes for addressing academic offences. Potential
offences include, but are not limited to:
In papers and assignments: Using someone else’s ideas or words without appropriate
acknowledgement. Submitting your own work in more than one course without the permission of
the instructor. Making up sources or facts. Obtaining or providing unauthorized assistance on
any assignment.
On tests and exams: Using or possessing unauthorized aids. Looking at someone else’s answers
during an exam or test. Misrepresenting your identity.
In academic work: Falsifying institutional documents or grades. Falsifying or altering any
documentation required by the University, including (but not limited to) doctor’s notes.
All suspected cases of academic dishonesty will be investigated following procedures outlined in
the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters. If you have questions or concerns about what
constitutes appropriate academic behaviour or appropriate research and citation methods, you are
expected to seek out additional information on academic integrity from your instructor or from
other institutional resources (see http://www.utoronto.ca/academicintegrity/resourcesfor
students.html).
A list of penalties applied to Writing Assignments that do not follow the Code of Behaviour on
Academic Matters will be provided on Quercus early in the Fall term.
14
Grading and Marks
Grades will reflect the standard outlined by the University of Toronto:
Percentage
Grade
Grade
Definition
90-100
A+
Outstanding
85-89
A
Exceptional
80-84
A-
77-79
B+
Good
73-76
B
70-72
B-
67-69
C+
Adequate
63-66
C
60-62
C-
57-59
D+
Marginal
53-56
D
50-52
D-
0-49
F
Inadequate
A Exceptional performance: strong evidence of original thinking; good organization,
capacity to analyze and synthesize; superior grasp of subject matter with sound critical
evaluations; evidence of extensive knowledge base.
B Good performance: evidence of grasp of subject matter; some evidence of critical
capacity and analytic ability; reasonable understanding of relevant issues; evidence of
familiarity with the literature.
C Intellectually adequate performance: student who is profiting from her or his university
experience; understanding of the subject matter and ability to develop solutions to simple
problems in the material.
D Minimally acceptable performance: some evidence of familiarity with subject matter and
some evidence that critical and analytic skills have been developed.
F Inadequate performance: little evidence of even superficial understanding of the subject
matter; weakness in critical and analytic skills; with limited or irrelevant use of literature
15
Exam Code of Conduct
Identification
You are required to place your T-Card clearly on the top right-hand corner of your
desk.
Unauthorized Aids/Electronic Devices
Unauthorized aids and/or electronic devices brought into the exam room are an
academic offence, whether you use them or not. Students who bring any
unauthorized materials or electronic devices into an exam room to assist, or obtain
assistance from other students or from an unauthorized source are liable to penalties
under the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters, including the loss of academic
credit for the course, suspension, or expulsion from the University of Toronto. No
materials or electronic devices may be used during an exam except those authorized
by the instructor. If the instructor has permitted the use of any aids, this will be
explicitly stated on the front page of your exam.
Personal Belongings
Whenever possible, leave your items in your locker. The university is not responsible
for any personal property that you leave in the exam room. Paper coffee cups, plastic
water bottles with labels, pencil cases, and cell phones are not permitted on exam
room desks. If you arrive wearing a peaked hat or baseball cap, you will be asked to
remove it before you sit down. Bags and books are to be left in designated areas
selected by the instructor/invigilator(s) and are not to be taken to your exam table. If
you bring valuables to the exam room, including cell phones, smart watches, tablets,
laptop computers, etc., they must be placed in the re-sealable plastic bag provided in
the exam room. You may place the bag with your items, closed, and on the floor
underneath your chair. The use of plastic bags is mandatory since possession of an
unauthorized electronic device is an academic offence; if you are not automatically
provided with a plastic bag, please request one and return it at the conclusion of the
exam so that it can be reused.
Arrival
Please arrive outside your exam room 20 minutes prior to the start of the exam.
Fifteen (15) minutes after the commencement of the exam, you will not be permitted
to enter an exam room. If you are more than 15 minutes late, you will be required to
16
petition for a deferred exam. If you are admitted to the exam room late, you will not
be given extra time to complete the exam.
During the Exam
Read the Examination Candidate form on your desk. This form must be signed in the
presence of the instructor or invigilator.
Communicating with any other student, in any manner, is not permitted while an
exam is in progress.
Required visits to the washroom must be under supervision.
If you are required to pray during an examination, notify your instructor or an
invigilator, who will make the necessary accommodation. Please not that you will not
be given extra time to write the exam.
You will not be permitted to leave the exam room (including to visit the washroom)
until at least ½ hour has passed from the start of the exam. You will not be permitted
to leave the exam room in the final 10 minutes of the exam.
If you must leave the exam early due to illness, inform your instructor or invigilator.
You are advised to visit the UTSC Health and Wellness Centre (or another medical
practitioner) to have the Verification of Student Illness or Injury form completed to
document your illness. This form is mandatory for a petition to request a deferred
exam.
End of Exam
Stop writing once your instructor or invigilator announces the conclusion of the exam.
If you continue to write after the end of the exam, invigilators may report this on an
Exam Incident Report form. Remain seated until all the answer books and exam
question papers have been collected. Do not leave the exam room with any exam
booklets, used or unused.
17
UTSC RESOURCES
Accessability
Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In
particular, if you have a disability/health consideration that may require
accommodations, please feel free to approach me and/or AccessAbility Services as
soon as possible.
416-287-7560 [email protected]
UTSC Library
Confused about finding library resources? There’s lots of help available! Go to the
library’s website for email inquiries, online chat, and to book appointments. We even
have a liaison librarian for sociology who can help with your questions!
Lola Rudin
Sociology Liaison Librarian
[email protected]sc.utoronto.ca
Academic Advising & Career Centre
Need help with study skills or life management skills? Not sure what classes to sign up
for? Interested in thinking about possible careers? Check out the Academic Advising
& Career Centre for workshops, tips, and one-on-one help!
AC213 416-287-7561
LGBTQ+ Students
Programming and events for the LGBTQ+ community are offered on all three
campuses. On the UTSC campus, the SC:OUT lounge (BV336) provides a space
where LGBTQ+ students and allies can hang out or study. The UTSC Positive Space
Committee meets monthly to deal with issues and needs of the LGBTQ+ community.
It is open to students, faculty, and staff – both LGBTQ+ and allies. Queer Orientation
will be held from September 24-29!
UTSC Positive Space Committee:
http://positivespace.utoronto.ca/scarborough/
U. of T. Sexual & Gender Diversity Office:
http:///sgdo.utoronto.ca/
18
Mental Wellness
Feeling sad, stressed, or depressed? You’re not alone! A survey of Canadian
University students showed that 54% have felt helpless, 56% experience
overwhelming anxiety, and 10% have considered suicide. Your mental health is as
important as your physical health. Get individual appointments, group therapy, and
resources at Health and Wellness.
SL270 416-287-7065
24-Hour Toronto Distress Centre Help Line
416-408-HELP(4537)
Writing Centre and English Language Development Centre
Need some help with your writing assignments? Book 50-minute individual
consultations, go to drop-in hours, take workshops, or get helpful handouts at the
Writing Centre in AC210.
Want to develop your academic English? Improve your communication skills? Learn
how to read and take notes more effectively? Ake advantage of the workshops, cafes,
and consultations offered by the English Language Development Centre in AC310.
International Students
The International Student Centre provides transition assistance, help understanding
taxes and health insurance, English conversational practice, and off-campus housing
assistance.
IC349 416-287-7518
Women’s and Trans Centre
This safe, welcoming space for self-identified women offers snacks, company, free
contraception and pads/tampons, a place to relax/de-stress, as well as biweekly cafes
and feminist events.
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. in SL224
Facebook.com/UTSCWTCentre
Twitter: @UTSCWTCentre
Instagram: @utscwomenscentre

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