Study Guides (400,000)
CA (150,000)
McMaster (9,000)
LABRST (100)
Study Guide

[LABRST 1A03] - Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (55 pages long!)


Department
Labour Studies
Course Code
LABRST 1A03
Professor
David Goutor
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 55 pages of the document.
McMaster
LABRST 1A03
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Post war domestic demand
Between 1947-1948 it becomes clear that Canada’s economy is growing and is going to be very
good. This resulted in the rise of domestic demand and war bonds are what Canadians bought in
major numbers. After this the war you see the cashing out of war bonds and an ideology emerges
that an active government is a good thing. This resulted in the vast expansion of education
systems. Furthermore the rise in domestic demand provided new jobs and lots of them as people
needed goods for not only themselves but also the rest of the world.
Victory Bonds
These bonds were produced by the Canadian government during war time and were a method for
the government to procure funds from the public with the purchaser being ensured they would
have a greater payout at the end of the war they were a way to fund the war effort. These bonds
were also used as a propaganda method in the war. Following the end of WWII the public began
cashing in these bonds on a grand scale.
Keynesianism
The economic theory that had the most influence on the rise of the welfare state was Keynesian
economics. This theory states that the government must intervene on a fiscal policy and
monetary policy level to control aggregate demand as when the economy can inefficiently
allocate resources. A part of this government intervention is to spend more when the economy is
in recession and provide tax cuts that will stimulate growth. When the economy recovers the
government is to then increase taxes and decrease spending. This theory suggested that the
government create some of the social welfare programs we have today as it recommended
spending in recession. This provided welfare services with funds and helped to encourage their
creation and improvement which resulted in a Keynesian welfare state between 1941-1971.
War Measures Act
The war measures act was first implemented by the government in and was used against unions
as a way of preventing them from slowing production during the war. The act also striped many
civil freedoms. Furthermore during the workers revolt the government in high paranoia keeps the
war measures act in place after the war. This creates a situation of desperation for workers as
they seek to unionize and have lost many of the war tie production jobs. The Winnipeg general
strike of 1919 resulted
Rand Formula
Developed by Justice Ivan Rand for the workers dispute at the Ford Windsor plant in 1947 the
strike was over securing union security and strike disruptions in productivity. The union sought
a closed shop approach through which they would have the sole ability to hire and fire
employees. Ford desired an ability to control and reduce strikes. Rand however, hated the idea of
closed union shop environment and thus developed a compromise. Rand decided to give the
union a dues check-off system which would be conducted by the employer and the dues would
be relegated to the union. However, this check-off system was not solely for those within the
union it was for all employees inside or outside the union. Rand argued that the union provides
benefits to the workplace that all employees share in and as a result freeloaders should have to
pay some fee. This also secured the union and their finances in the workplace. It also solidified
the union-employer-employee relationship. However, the drawback or trade-off was that unions
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

could not strike under contract. Furthermore, if any employees did strike then the union was
responsible for forcing them back to work and could be fined or potentially decertified if they did
not act. As a result a large amount of union democratic potential was lost because union stewards
were no longer required to collect dues and lost their positions. Furthermore, the union power
structure changed to a more hierarchical structure which removed more union democracy
through voting on issues. Finally, this made the union leaders more dependent upon management
and union strike power had been neutered.
Wildcat strike
The wildcat strike was a strike used by unions while under contract which was removed as an
option by the Rand formula. This form of strike was a direct and immediate form of action used
by the most militant of unions. The method was powerful and effective for drawing attention to
workplace issues and gave unions a great deal of leverage.
Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF)
The CCF was a Canadian organization that acted as a political party and was the forefather of the
NDP. The party has a very socialist agenda and seeks to protect workers and create social
programs that benefit society. This party was committed to the expansion of government
programs and social work camps in the depression. They promoted collective bargaining through
a legislative approach and attempted to reform many Canadian laws. However, the party had
limited success in the 1930's due to the economic downturn. In 1942 and 1943 new strike waves
began some of which were in the war industries. Unions were expanding after the depression and
people figured that the workers deserved better wages now that the depression was over as a
result of government inaction on the issue many people began to side with the CCF and favour
them as a new political party. In 1943 the CCF pulled ahead and by 1944 is threatening to take
over the nation. They wanted a big government that was active in the social movement and
would influence labour laws for the public as a result the government created PC 1003.
Canadian Congress of labour CCL
A voice of labour and a way to coordinate equity on a national scale was required in Canada and
in 1886 the Trades and labour congress became the Canadian congress of labour. They tried to
organize politically and with unions, trade policy was a big one and protection with high tariffs
so Canadians can compete with imports was vital to their platform. However, the movement was
not big yet and was not specifically telling everybody what to do. This proved that individual
leadership really mattered. Macdonald as a very practical politician was willing to do business
with the congress which made many liberals open to working with labour. Thus, we begin to see
the labour movement making a difference as the Factory Acts spawned out of this alliance. These
were the first laws governing factories basic standards. Things like life safety regulations, child
labour and minimum age to work in a factory resulted. If a child was caught working in a
factory, punishment was on parents and not the factory itself though which was perhaps not the
best.
On-to-Ottawa Trek
This was a long journey where thousands of unemployed men protesting the dismal conditions in
the federal relief camps. The men walked out on strike in 1935 and voted to bring grievances to
the federal government by crossing Alberta and Saskatchewan by the time they got to
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version