Study Guides (248,364)
Canada (121,503)
Psychology (952)
PSYC 3310 (12)

Health Psychology Chapter

5 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3310
Professor
Jennifer Dobson
Semester
Winter

Description
The Biomedical Model Illnesses can be explained by focusing on problems in an organisms biological functioning Focuses on lower­level biological processes Does not examine health in a broader context Ignores psychological and social influences Problems with this model Too reductionist Reduces illness to only biological factors, ignores the role of psychology, sociological factors The biomedical model cannot account for many findings Psychological and social factors including stress, social support, and emotions play roles in progression and  management of cardiac disease and cancers Interventions that prioritize psychological and social factors are effective at treating biological illnesses Illness disproportionately affects different social groups The Biomedical Model and Mental Health Assumptions regarding mental disorders: Brain diseases caused by biological abnormalities located in the brain No meaningful distinction between mental disease and physical disease and biological treatment is  preferred Implications of the biomedical model of mental disorders The theory that mental disorders are caused by chemical imbalances in the brain has important cultural  uses This explanation is endorsed by many patient advocacy groups Biological treatments of mental disorders dominate  Scientists have yet to identify a biological cause of any psychiatric diagnosis Consequences of the Biomedical Model Failure to reduce stigma Attitudes towards people with mental disorders have not improved Desire for social distance from people with schizophrenia has increased  Mental illness rates increasing The Biopsychosocial Model Biological, psychological and social factors combine and interact to influence physical and mental health Allowed design of multilevel approach’s to human health Critiques of this model A biopsychosocial model of health may encourage a blame the patient attitude or lead people to believe that  illness is all in your head The fact that biology, sociology, and psychology contribute to illness is obvious, it cannot be the basis for a  psychological theory or model This model is hard to implement as an intervention Promoting Health and Preventing Illness Health Promotion: efforts to encourage people to engage in healthy behaviors Prevention: Targeted efforts to reduce the probability of getting an illness or reduce the severity of illness  when it does occur  Primary: aimed at healthy people to keep them healthy Secondary: Aimed at people affected by health condition. Goal is to prevent the condition from leading to  more sever consequences  Tertiary: disease or disorder has not been prevented. Goal to reduce the impact of disorder on patients Informational Appeals: provide facts and arguments about why it is important to engage in behavior Fear Appeals: use fear to persuade people to change their behavior Factors that affect the persuasiveness of appeal Amount of fear elicited, other emotions elicited, Presence of clear behavioral recommendation, Timing,  Severity, specificity of message, personalization of message, message framing, believability of message.  Message Framing Gain Frame: framed in terms of positive consequences of healthy behavior  Loss Frame: framed in terms of negative consequences of unhealthy behavior Berry et al  Studied the relationship between believability of exercise­related messages and intentions to exercise Two types of messages­ health and beauty RESULTS: HEALTH CONDITION  Implicit believability predicted attitudes toward exercise and intention to exercise P’s who were able to quickly rate exercise as healthy and good for them were more likely to hold positive  attitudes towards exercise and were more likely to intend to exercise Explicit believability did not predict attitudes towards exercise Explicit believability is more subject to social desirability than implicit believability is – p’s may have explicitly  agreed with message of ads but did not agree implicitly therefore attitudes and intentions did not change RESULTS APPEARANCE CONDITION:  Implicit did not predict attitude towards exercise The more participants implicitly believed that exercise can improve their appearance, the lower their  intention to exercise Models in ads may show unattainable appearance May lead to greater body dissatisfaction Explicit believability did not predict attitudes towards exercises The Health Belief Model Suggests that the actions we take to safeguard out health are influenced by a number of factors, including  (a) general healt
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 3310

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit