Study Guides (390,000)
CA (150,000)
UTSG (10,000)
HIS (300)

War in European History


Department
History
Course Code
HIS103Y1
Professor
Alison Smith

This preview shows half of the first page. to view the full 2 pages of the document.
Mashie Alam
BOOK: War in European History, Chapter 4, (by Michael Howard)
Chapter 4: The War of the Professionals:
By the 18th century, European wars were being conducted by professional armed
forces of a kind familiar to today’s type of militia
They were guaranteed employment rights, wages, and career prospects
In Prussian, the idea of a war lord remained
In France, the idea of self-indulgent noblesse continued
In Britain, a centralized unified force began
Yet, by 1700, a state machine was developed to maintain full-time force on foot,
paying, feeding, clothing, and organizing a hierarchy of men in an army
Furthermore, the development of military practice and technology made this system
better
PAYING FOR THE ARMY
Firstly, the armies had to be subsidized
Taxpayers were to pay taxes to help develop the armed forces
United Kingdom had such taxing methods
But for the Dutch, their wealth from overseas trade enabled them to strengthen their
army
PRINCE MAURICE OF ORANGES CONTRIBUTIONS TO ARMIES
Maurice of Orange saw the need for fire power in a country
He believed that military formations and procedure would maximize fire power and
ensure continuous delivery
He got many of his ideas from Roman and Greek military textbooks
His military models helped the Dutch, the Scots, the Swedes, the Brandenburgers,
and England
It did not help Spain or France since they concentrated on glory and panache
Maurice found a military academy in Siegen to educate Protestant noblesse about
the military
Maurices pupil, Jacob Delagardie, became Swedens Gustavus Adolphus military
instructor
GUSTAVOS ADOLPHUS & JACOB DELAGARDIES ARMY
With Jacob Delagardies ideas, Gustavos Adolphus’ army looked remarkably modern
as ours
For cavalry, Sweden learned to use arme blanche, and that is to charge the sword
with a disciplined mass as an instrument of shock
For Artillery, Gustavos worked incessantly to overcome the disadvantage of
immobility with new cannons that were shorter but more effective
LOUIS DE GEER
www.notesolution.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version