KINE 2049 Research Methods - notes for final exam.docx

5 Pages
283 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology & Health Science
Course
KINE 3350
Professor
Kathy Broderick
Semester
Winter

Description
 Research Methods: Chapter 8 – Qualitative Research  ­quantitative research answers questions like how many and what types of individuals are  participating in physical activity  ­these numerical techniques cant capture the role of the human experience ­qualitative studies allow us to add depth and meaning ­qualitative research relies heavily on observation in natural settings ­the difference between qualitative and quantitative does not rest in the methods and  procedures but in the different ways in which the research questions are asked ­Qualitative: task is to discover then a hypothesis emerges; investigator is aware of their  own bias and strives to capture the subject reality of participants; can last months or  years; use a narrative format ­Quantitative: hypothesis is stated in advance, at minimum those being studied will be  aware that they are in an “experiment”; investigator assumes an unbiased stance; usually  lasts hours or days ­ethnography – research that incorporates both a systematic observation strategy and a  depthness of insight and understanding into what is being observed; used in sociology of  sport ­researcher combines skills of keen observation with knowledge background in the  subject and develops what is known as “thick description”  ­historical studies can be divided into:  1) descriptive history: goal is to describe and recreate the accuracy of the experiences in  the past experiences that because of time and other factors seem to have been lost 2) analytical history: takes the description one step further and asks questions like “why  did these events happen?” ­feminist methodology is interest in women’s topics; gender analysis ­they focus on the study of women, taking into consideration their needs, interests, and  experiences ­also explores how woman are influenced by the world in which they live in ­feminist methodologies often relies on personal voice – women telling own stories  Chapter 9 – Other Types of Research ­surveys are examples of descriptive research designed to gather info on habits, opinions,  or attitudes ­survey research is particularly susceptible to 2 types of error: 1)  non­sampling errors  ­researchers are somewhat limited in their ability to asses the quality of the findings  because there is no way of checking the accuracy  ­it can be divided into 4 categories: processing errors (mistakes in handling data),  response errors (subjects provide incorrect info), missing data errors , and data collection  error methods (stem from the methods and procedures used by the researcher in  conducting the survey; eg. Wording in survey)  2) sampling errors ­errors occurring from any difference between the data obtained from the sample and the  data that would have been obtained from a complete census  ­2 factors that are important in survey research are precision and bias ­precision is the measure of consistency of the findings; if findings are inconsistent then  the precision is low  ­survey that is imprecise tends to hit the target in different places ­survey that is biased tends to consistently miss the center of the target ­precision and bias operate simultaneously  ­goal: low bias and high precision ­margin of error statistic indicates a range of values within which the true population  values should lie ­survey reliability and validity are important considerations ­reliability is related to the sample size; generally, higher the sample size the higher the  reliability  ­validity is concerned with how representative the sample is of the parent population ­sample representativeness is ultimately most important ­most common distributions of surveys: mailed, personal interviews, telephone  interviews ­questionnaires:  ­most commonly used method ­advantage: wide geographic area, many can be distributed ­disadvantage: people fail to return the survey, time consuming because of the time it  takes to mail them then to receive them ­personal interviews: ­advantage: respondents can give detailed answers and ask for clarifications, response  rates are generally high ­disadvantages: limited to a geographic area, time consuming, limited to smaller samples,  problem with consistency and neutrality on the part of the interviewer, subjects may be  hesitant to share personal info ­te
More Less

Related notes for KINE 3350

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit