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Midterm

PSYC 3490 Midterm: Ch6 Solutions

3 Pages
77 Views
Fall 2015

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 3490
Professor
Heather Jenkin
Study Guide
Midterm

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51. Provide examples of three situations in which information processing
changes are important in the functioning of older adults.
Driving safely
Remembering what youre suppose to do like bathe
How to cook
54. Do you agree that videogames can improve cognitive functioning?
Yes
Attention involves ability to focus while ignoring other features, to shift focus, and
to coordinate info from multiple sources. Videogames help with this.
Lab studies suggest that with age, attentional processes are less efficient.
Vid games can enhance attentional skills with oldies. It does for younger ppl.
Mostly first person shooter games will help.
Increase reaction time, accuracy in performance etc. can help with driving.
Peripheral attention, Useful field of view improves.
Brain games can help focused and sustained attention
55. What are the risks of having aging drivers on the road? On the basis of
available evidence, should older adults be restricted in their driving?
Not entirely.
Make sure their medical condition isn’t gonna hinder
Require proper visual and auditory aid
Don’t drive at night
Theyre less likely to DUI
Less likely to drive distracted ex cellphone
More experienced with driving
Risks: lower reaction time and less efficient attention, loss of visual acuity,
increase sensitivity to glare, cant see in dark, physical changes, meds can cause
drowsiness,
57. Provide a brief description of how working memory is affected by aging and
summarize the neuropsychological data used to understand these effects.
Working Memory – keeps info temporarily available and active in consciousness.
Four parts: auditory , visual, episodic buffer, central executive.
Lower working capacity
According to scaffolding, old ppl able to recruit alt neural circuits as needed for
task demands to make up for losses elsewhere. Aka WORKING capacity is
declines but can compensate. Scaffolding gets better with exercise and mental
training

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Description
51. Provide examples of three situations in which information processing changes are important in the functioning of older adults.  Driving safely  Remembering what youre suppose to do like bathe  How to cook 54. Do you agree that videogames can improve cognitive functioning?  Yes  Attention involves ability to focus while ignoring other features, to shift focus, and to coordinate info from multiple sources. Videogames help with this.  Lab studies suggest that with age, attentional processes are less efficient.  Vid games can enhance attentional skills with oldies. It does for younger ppl.  Mostly first person shooter games will help.  Increase reaction time, accuracy in performance etc. can help with driving.  Peripheral attention, Useful field of view improves.  Brain games can help focused and sustained attention 55. What are the risks of having aging drivers on the road? On the basis of available evidence, should older adults be restricted in their driving?  Not entirely.  Make sure their medical condition isn’t gonna hinder  Require proper visual and auditory aid  Don’t drive at night  Theyre less likely to DUI  Less likely to drive distracted ex cellphone  More experienced with driving  Risks: lower reaction time and less efficient attention, loss of visual acuity, increase sensitivity to glare, cant see in dark, physical changes, meds can cause drowsiness, 57. Provide a brief description of how working memory is affected by aging and summarize the neuropsychological data used to understand these effects.  Working Memory – keeps info temporarily available and active in consciousness. Four parts: auditory , visual, episodic buffer, central executive.  Lower working capacity  According to scaffolding, old ppl able to recruit alt neural circuits as needed for task demands to make up for losses elsewhere. Aka WORKING capacity is declines but can compensate. Scaffolding gets better with exercise and mental training  Older ppl less activation of default network. They can’t deactivate it during memory tasks, which is bad. Therefore fewer resources devoted to info they need to retain.  High functioning old ppl can use default network to augment performance in working mem tasks. 58. Summarize the “score card” showing which memory functions decline and which do not in later life.  Abilities that decline – Episodic mem Source mem False mem Tip-of-tongue Prospective mem  Abilities that DONT decline – Flashbulb mem Semantic mem Procedural mem Implicit mem Autobiographical mem “Reminiscence bump” 59. How do findings on identity, self-efficacy, control beliefs, and stereotype threat influence your interpretation of the effects of aging on working memory? Argue for or against the position that age differences in memory are an artifact of methods used to assess
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