PSYC 473T Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Freudian Slip, Impression Management, Libido

41 views3 pages
Response set: When people have a set way that they tend to respond to self-report questions
History, context, and environment are important to self-concept
Self-concept is the set of ideas that you had about yourself
Two important elements of self-concept are awareness of experiences and reflecting on oneself
At 0-1 year, infant has physical awareness
At 2-3 years, toddler recognizes self in mirror and pictures, uses language to demonstrate self-
awareness
At 3-4 years, toddler can use personality traits to describe self and others
School age children are more aware of selves in reference to others, develop a private sense of
self and more concrete self-concept
At adolescence, more abstract motivation, characteristics, think more broadly
Objective self-awareness: object of others' attention
In adolescence, internalize others' evaluations, especially evaluations of those who are very
important to the adolescent and internalize society and societal norms
Reflected appraisals: forms basis of self-esteem, person's perception of self is influenced by how
other people see them
Begin to question identity at 15-16
3 steps to ethnic identity: unexamined, ethnic identity search, achieving some sort of ethnic
identity
As an adult, good sense of who we are and how we feel about ourselves; self-concept comes more
from within and identity comes from others
Self-concept develops from social comparisons with others, reflected appraisals of others, and
self-appraisals
Individualistic cultures value bravery, creativity, and self-reliance
Collectivistic cultures value obligation, duty, tradition, dependence, and harmony
Independent self-concept: autonomous, self-contained, self-actualized, truest self when alone
Interdependent self-concept: include others, group context, truest self when with others
Possible selves are aspects of self-concept of who we might become: hoped-for-self, feared self
Ideal and ought self are standards used to organize information and motivate behavior
When the ideal/ought self is different form actual self, emotional consequences are experienced
True self is the part that is genuine and uninfluenced by context or outside factors; represents
who you really are regardless of outward behavior
Self-esteem is the amount of value people place on the self
Self-esteem is a perception and not necessarily accurate
People generally report high (positive) self-esteem
Low self-esteem is lacking positive views of the self and people are more vulnerable to everyday
challenges and more easily influenced socially
People with high self-esteem cope positively with failure, persist longer, and recover from
setbacks more quickly
Unstable self-esteem is very responsive to information potentially relevant to their self-worth;
might be good if you are low on self-esteem but people with high unstable may have problems
coping
Self-concept clarity is how well people know themselves
Self-esteem= successes/pretentions
Erikson 5th stage of psychosocial development: identity vs. identity confusion
Rogers: acceptance of whole person, unconditional positive regard; validation; have true self and
actual self be the same
McAdams: story/narrative identity
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows page 1 of the document.
Unlock all 3 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

School age children are more aware of selves in reference to others, develop a private sense of self and more concrete self-concept: at adolescence, more abstract motivation, characteristics, think more broadly, objective self-awareness: object of others" attention. Self-concept develops from social comparisons with others, reflected appraisals of others, and self-appraisals. Independent self-concept: autonomous, self-contained, self-actualized, truest self when alone. Ideal and ought self are standards used to organize information and motivate behavior who you really are regardless of outward behavior. Self-esteem is the amount of value people place on the self. Self-esteem is a perception and not necessarily accurate: people generally report high (positive) self-esteem. Self-concept clarity is how well people know themselves. Self-esteem= successes/pretentions: erikson 5th stage of psychosocial development: identity vs. identity confusion, rogers: acceptance of whole person, unconditional positive regard; validation; have true self and actual self be the same, mcadams: story/narrative identity.

Get access

Grade+20% OFF
$8 USD/m$10 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Grade+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
40 Verified Answers