Textbook Notes (367,994)
Canada (161,548)
Psychology (661)
PSYC 2500 (28)
Chapter 1-5

Developmental Psychology Ch.1-5

21 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2500
Professor
Gerald Buchanan
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 1 02/07/2014 Why study child development? ­childhood is a time of incredible growth and development. ­children are different from adults. ­Education and policies (headstart programs, eyewitness questioning) A Good Theory is… Internally consistent, based on data and explains all existing data, clear and testable, Parsimonious. Fundamental Developmental Theories Biological perspective, Psychodynamic perspective, Learning perspectives, contextual perspective. Biological perspective : Intellectual and personality development, as well as physical and motor development, proceed according to  biological plan.  ­Maturational theory: child development reflects a specific and prearranged scheme or plan within the body.  HOWEVER, this theory was disregarded due to the fact that it had little to say about the impact of  environmental factors.  ­Ethological theory: views development from an evolutionary perspective. Survival value. Clinging,  grasping, and crying are adaptive for infants because they elicit caregiving from adults.  ­ Critical Period: the time when a specific type of learning can take place; before or after the critical period  the same learning is difficult or even impossible.  ­Imprinting: creating emotional bond with mother. Lorenz studied ducklings, removed from mother right at  birth and replaced mother with another moving object (himself).  Psychodynamic perspective : OLDEST scientific perspective on child development. Theory holds that development is largely determine  by how well people resolve conflicts they face at different ages. ­id: primitive instincts and drives, presses for immediate gradification(devil). ­Ego: practical and rational, tries to resolve conflict. (self) ­Superego: acts as moral agent, adult standards of right and wrong(angel). Psychosexual Phases(5): Oral: sucking and exploring with the mouth (babies) Anal: bowel control (2­3) Phallic: notice differences between sexes (3­7) Latency: energies are sublimated (7­puberty) Genital: mental energies being taken up in activities reminiscent. (11­adult) Erikson(8 stages): trust vs. mistrust  birth­1  sense that world if safe. Autonomy vs. shame 1­3   realize that one is an independent Initiative vs. guilt      3­6    develop willingness to try new things Industry vs. inferiority  6­adult     learn basic skills and work with others Intimacy vs. isolation    young adult   commit to loving another Generativity vs. stagnation mid adult     contribute to youngers people Integrity vs. despair         elder          view ones life as satisfactory The Learning Perspective : ­Ivan Pavlov’s classical conditioning.  ­Used with dog and little Albert, rat associated with loud noise= fear of rat. ­B.F Skinner’s Operant conditioning in which the consequences of a behavior determine whether that  behavior is repeated in the future. Positive and negative reinforcement and punishment.  Ex. Neg reinforcement: if you clean your room, you don’t have to do the dishes.  ­Children sometimes learn through observational learning or imitation.  Social cognitive theory, “monkey­see, monkey­do” Albert Bandura. The bobo doll study.  ­Self­efficacy; beliefs about their own abilities. Children are more likely to imitate fav singer if they are told  they are a good singer, vice versa. Contextual Perspective: Environment is important to development of a child. Culture which is made up of knowledge, attitudes, and behavior associated with a group of people, affects  the child’s development.  Ex. Canadians want their children to do well n school and obtain a degree to sustain themselves in the  future. While in Africa, people want their children to develop survival skills such as hunting.  Bronfenbrenner: believed child development was embedded in a series of complex and interactive systems.  Macrosystem: culture. Exosystem: family friends, extended family, neighbors, community. Mesosytem: what  happens in a microsystem may effect others. Ex: if you’ve had a stressful day at work you may be grouchy  at home. Microsystem: parents and siblings, school. Lecture #2 02/07/2014 How Genes Work? ­Baby gets half of the chromosomes from mom and half from dad. 23 in sperm, 23 in egg= 46 in baby. On 23  pair, XX is girl, XY is boy. DNA­ Adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine.  ­instructions called gene.  ­for each trait we have one DNA sequence from mom and one from dad. ALLELES. ­Sometimes alleles are the same (homozygous) and sometimes they are different (heterozygous). Then,  the dominant allele will be the one to “take over” and provide the phenotype. How Genes skip a generation: A is dominant, a is recessive (say, curly hair and straight hair, respectively). Both mom and dad have curly hair, but they are both carriers of the straight hair allele. This couple has a 25% chance of having a child with straight hair.                                    Mother                                A                 a Father         A          AA               Aa                   A          AA               Aa Genes­Environment Interactions Genes affect the environment Example: temperament Lecture #2 02/07/2014 Types of gene­environment correlations (rGE)  Passive rGE Parents provide both genes and environment Activer GE (niche picking) Actively seeking out environments that reinforce dispositions. Evocative/reactiver GE Behaviours elicit certain reactions from the environment. Several psychological traits showed an increase in heritability as the twins developed. Authors’ interpretation: Active gene­environment relations (niche picking). Alternative explanation: late gene expression. Environment affects the genes expression ­epigenetics Stages of development See text.  Factors Affecting Prenatal Development Lecture #2 02/07/2014 Teratogens ­Diseases ­Drugs ­Environmental toxins Mother’s age Nutrition­ not enough folic acid can lead to spina bifida Stress: Method Prenatal cross­fostering design Children conceived by IVF One group of children was biologically related to mom Another group was biologically unrelated to mom (egg/embryo donation). Measures (children are 4­10 years old):  Mom recalls/medical records: gestational age, birth weight, mom’s stress levels during pregnancy. Questionnaires: child’s anxiety and ADHD symptoms and child’s anti­social behavior.  Results Gestational age and birth weight were correlated with prenatal stress in both groups. Child’s anxiety and anti­social behaviour were correlated with prenatal stress in both groups, but in both  groups this relationship was explained by mom’s current depression/anxiety symptoms. Child’s ADHD symptoms were correlated with prenatal stress only in the related group. Lecture #3 02/07/2014 Newborn Physical Development Lecture #3 02/07/2014 Newborn reflexes (VIDEO) What are the implications of the differences? ­Experience­dependent learning ­Nature vs. nurture ­Contextual theories What are the implications of the universalities? ­Ethological theory ­Contextual theories Postpartum Depression (PPD) Significant symptoms of depression and/or anxiety: ­Appear in the first 12 months after birth ­Continue for more than two weeks ­Interfere with mom’s ability to function Example items: Feeling overwhelmed Feeling rage Lecture #3 02/07/2014 Feeling disconnected 8% of women have depression symptoms 12 weeks postpartum Associated factors: ­Pr
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2500

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit