Textbook Notes (368,566)
Canada (161,966)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010Y (17)
n/a (17)
Chapter

Block D - Energy and Temperature.docx

5 Pages
118 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PHYL 1010Y
Professor
n/a
Semester
Winter

Description
Module XIV Energy & Temperature INTRODUCTION: This unit begins with the basic concepts of energy expenditure and caloric balance. The control of food  (energy) intake and the relationship that exists between energy intake and energy output are examined. Next you  will see the various factors that affect a person's metabolic rate and a method of calculating metabolic rate. The next topic is the regulation of body temperature. This section opens with the concept of  homeothermy and then goes into the various mechanisms that are available to the body to maintain constant  body temperature. Hyperthermia will be defined as an elevation of body temperature regardless of cause. This  leads to a discussion of fever, exercise, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. The balance between energy input and energy output is illustrated in figure 22­18. CONTROL OF FOOD INTAKE: • Current model for behavioral regulation of food intake is based on 2 hypothalamic centers o A feeding center that is tonically active (promotes food intake) o A satiety center that stops food intake by inhibiting the feeding center (decreases food intake) Leptin: • Protein hormone from adipocytes (in the adipose tissue) that acts as a satiety factor o Decreases food intake • As fat stores increase, adipose cells secrete more leptin and food intake decreases • Inhibits NPY in a negative feedback pathway Neuropeptide Y (NPY): • Brain neurotransmitter (secreted by the hypothatlamus) that stimulates food intake The term kilocalorie (kcal) is equivalent to the term Calorie (with a large C ) that nutritionists and  manufacturing firms use. Another synonymous term that you might hear is "large calorie". All of these terms  mean 1000 calories (with the small c). CALORIMETRY: • Measured in kilocalories  o The amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1L of water by 1  C o AKA Calorie (C) Direct Calorimetry Indirect Calorimetry A procedure in which food it burned and the heat  Estimation of metabolic rate by measuring oxygen  released is trapped and measured consumption Most direct way to measure the E content of food Most direct way to determine metabolic rate METABOLIC RATE: It is possible to estimate a person's metabolic rate if we know the volume of oxygen that the person  consumes per unit time. For every liter of oxygen that is consumed, 4.5 ­ 5 kilocalories of energy are produced.  If we assume that the person is on a mixed diet, then for every liter of oxygen that is consumed, 4.825  1 Module XIV Energy & Temperature kilocalories of energy are produced. This is sometimes rounded off to 4.8 kcal per liter of oxygen consumed. The basal metabolic rate can be estimated using the following equations (rough estimates): BMR (for men) = 1.0 kcal / hour / kg body weight BMR (for women) = 0.9 kcal / hour / kg body weight Metabolic Rate Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) An individual’s resting E expenditure An individual’s lowest metabolic rate Measured by O  c2nsumption (indirect calorimetry Lowest when sleeping Metabolic Rate (kcal/day) = L of O  Con2umed/Day x 4.8 kcal/L O 2 Example: • 70 kg male whose O  c2nsumption is 20L/hour o MR = 480 L O /d2y x 4.8 = 2304 kcal/day Main Factors Affecting Metabolic Rate: 1. Age and sex i. Males have higher BMR than females ii. MR declines with age 2. Amount of lean muscle mass i. Muscle has higher oxygen consumption than adipose tissue ii. Results in more calories burned at rest 3. Activity level i. PA and muscle contraction increase metabolic rate over the basal rate 4. Diet i. Resting metabolic rate increases after a meal (diet induced thermogenesis) ii. Fats cause little thermogenesis, proteins cause the most thermogenesis 5. Hormones i. BMR increased by thyroid hormones and catecholamines E and NE ii. Some peptide hormones increase BMR as well 6. Genetics i. Inherit efficient or inefficient metabolism The balance between heat input, heat production and heat loss is illustrated in figure 22­19. Figure 22­ 21 is a good summary of the body's responses to extreme environmental temperatures. Body temperature (core temperature) is normally maintained at a fairly constant 37°C. Body  temperature varies considerably among resting healthy individuals. Depending on the activity pattern of the  individual, temperature variations between 36 and 39°C can be considered normal (the upper limit can be  expected in hard exercise for example). Therefore, normal body temperature should be thought of as a "range of  core temperatures" that may be expected in normal individuals under various conditions. The most widely  accepted measures of normal body temperatures are rectal, oral, thermoscan and occasionally axillary  temperatures. Rectal temperatures obtained at a depth of 5 to 10 cm are normally regarded as representative of  core body temperature. Oral (sublingual) temperatures are normally 0.6°C lower than rectal temperatures.  Thermoscan devices measure body temperature using an ear probe. 2 Module XIV Energy & Temperature REGULATION OF BODY TEMPERATURE: • Body gain and loses heat by a variety of mechanisms • Humans are homeothermic, meaning that our bodies regulate body temp within a narrow range o Temperature regulation in humans is linked to metabolic heat production Heat Gain has 2 Components: • Internal heat production – Heat from normal metabolism & released during muscle contraction • External heat input – Heat from environment through either radiation or conduction Radiant Heat Gain Conductive Heat Gain External heat input All objects with a temperature above absolute zero, The transfer of heat between objects that are in contact  give off radiant E (radiation) that can be absorbed by  with each other other objects Example? Skin touching a heating pad or the skin and  You absorb radiant E each time you sit in the sun or in  hot water front of a fire Heat Loss: Type of Heat Loss Description
More Less

Related notes for PHYL 1010Y

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit