Textbook Notes (368,799)
Canada (162,168)
Commerce (1,696)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2

6 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMMERCE 1BA3
Professor
Emad Mohammad
Semester
Fall

Description
Accounting – Chapter 2: Investing and Financing Decisions and the Statement of Financial  Position Concepts Emphasized in Chapter 2 Primary objective of external financial reporting: is to provide useful economic information  about a business to help external parties make sound financial decisions. The users of accounting information are identified as decision makers.  The initial amount borrowed is called the principal.  Accounting Assumptions 4 of 4 basic assumptions that underlie accounting measurement and reporting relate to the  statement of financial position. Separate­entity assumption: states that business transactions are separate from the transactions  of the owners. Unit of measure assumption: states that accounting information should be measured and  reported in the national monetary unit. Continuity (going concern) assumption: states that businesses are assumed to continue to  operate into the foreseeable future. Basic Accounting Principle Cost principle: requires assets to be recorded at the historical cash­equivalent cost, which is  cash paid plus the current monetary value of all non­cash considerations also given in the  exchange, on the data of the transaction. Elements of the Classified Statement of Financial Position Assets: economic resources controlled by an entity as a result of past transactions or events and  from which future economic benefits may be obtained. For example, consolidated statement of financial position – consolidated means that the  classified elements of a company’s statement of financial position are combined with those of  other companies under its control. Column / report format – assets listed first, then liabilities and then shareholders’ equity. Typically, assets of a company include: 1. Current assets (short­term) a) Cash and cash equivalents b) Short­term investments c) Trade and other receivables ­ Trade receivables are amounts owed by customers who  purchased products and services on credit. Generally collected within a year. Notes  receivable are written promises by customers and others to pay a company fixed amounts  by specific dates. d) Inventories – goods that 1) are held for sale to customers in the normal course of business  or 2) are used to produce goods or services for sale. e) Prepayments (i.e. expenses paid in advance of use) f) Other current assets 2. Non­current assets (long­term) a) Property, plant and equipment (at cost less accumulated depreciation) b) Investment in associates – shares of another corporation. c) Financial assets – investment in shares or debt instruments issued by other companies  that a company intends to keep for longer than 1 year. d) Goodwill – intangible asset that arises when a company purchases another business to  control its operating, investment and financing decisions. e) Intangible assets – patents, trademarks, operating rights. f) Other (miscellaneous) assets Current assets: assets that will be used or turned into cash, normally within one year or the  operating business cycle, whichever is longer. Inventory is always considered to be a current  asset, regardless of the time needed to produce and sell it. Non­current assets: are considered to be long term because they will be used or turned into cash  over a period longer than the next year. Liabilities: are present debts or obligations of the entity that result from past transactions, which  will be paid with assets or services. Typically, liabilities of a company include the following: 1. Current liabilities (short­term) a) Trade payables – total amount owed to suppliers of materials that a company used in  producing and packaging its products for sale. b) Short­term borrowings – short­term loans from banks. c) Income taxes payable – estimate of the amount of taxes. d) Accrued liabilities – total amount owed to suppliers for various types of services such as  payroll, rent and other obligations. e) Other current liabilities 2. Non­current liabilities (long­term) a) Long­term borrowings – from banks and other lenders b) Deferred income tax liabilities – arise from temporary differences between the profit  measured in accordance with IFRS and taxable profit that is determined in conformity  with applicable tax laws. c) Provisions – estimated liabilities characterized by uncertainty about the exact amount of  be paid and the timing of the payment. d) Other liabilities Current liabilities: are obligations that will be paid in cash (or other current assets) or satisfied  by providing service within the coming year. Liabilities are listed by order of time to maturity. Non­current liabilities: are a company’s debts that have maturities extending beyond one year  from the date of the statement of financial position. Shareholders’ equity (owners’ equity or stockholders’ equity): the financing provided by the  owners and the operations of the business. Owners invest (purchase shares) in a company because they expect to receive two types of cash  flow: dividends, which are a distribution of the corporation’s earnings (a return on shareholders’  investment) and gains from selling their shares for more than they paid (capital gains). Typically the shareholders’ equity of a corporation includes the following: 1. Share capital (or capital stock) 2. Retained earnings (accumulate earnings that have not been declared as dividends) 3. Other components Share capital: results from owners providing cash (and sometimes other assets) to the business. Contributed surplus: when shareholders contribute in excess of the amount allocated to share  capital, such as premiums on shares issued. Contributed capital: the sum of share capital and contributed surplus. Retained earnings: refers to the accumulated earnings of a company that are not distributed to  the owners and are reinvested in the business. Non­controlling interest – when a company does not have all the voting shares issued by a  different company, so its shareholders’ equity is divided between the controlling and non­ controlling shareholders.  What Type of Business Activities Cause Changes in Financial Statement Amounts? Nature of Business Transactions Transaction: is 1) an exchange between a business and one or more external parties to a  business or 2) a measurable internal event, such as adjustments for the use of assets in  operations.  Only economic resources and debts resulting from past transactions are recorded on the  statement of f
More Less

Related notes for COMMERCE 1BA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit