Textbook Notes (368,278)
Canada (161,760)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 271 (57)
Chapter 5

PSYC271 Chapter 5 Research Methods of Biopsychology.docx

6 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 271
Professor
Peter J Gagolewicz
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYC271 Chapter 5 Research Methods of Biopsychology 5.1 Methods of Visualizing & Stimulating the Living Human Brain ­ X­rays capture internal structure that differ greatly from their surroundings. No use in  brain imaging because brain structures all similar. ­ Contrast X­Rays: ­ Contrast X­Ray Techniques: X­ray techniques that involve the injection into 1  compartment of the body a substance that absorbs X­Rays either less than or more  than the surrounding tissue ­ Cerebral Angiography: uses the infusion of a radio­opaque dye into a cerebral  artery to visualize the cerebral circulatory system during X­Ray photography  ▯ good for locating vascular damage ­ X­Ray Computed Tomography: ­ Computed Tomography (CT): a computer­assisted X­Ray procedure that can  be used to visualize the brain and other internal structures of the living body ­  ­ Magnetic Resonance Imaging: ­ Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): a procedure in which high­resolution  images of the structures of the living brain are constructed from the measurement  of waves that hydrogen atoms emit when they are activated by radio frequency  waves in a magnetic field ­ Positron Emission Tomography (PET):  ­ first technique to show brain activity, not just structure ­ 2­deoxyglucose (2­DG): a substance similar to glucose that is taken up by  active neurons in the brain and accumulates in them because, unlike glucose, it  cannot be metabolized ­ Functional MRI: ­ Functional MRI (fMRI): a magnetic resonance imaging technique for inferring  brain activity by measuring increased oxygen flow into particular areas ­ most common technique used today ­ BOLD Signal: a blood­oxygen­level­dependent signal, which is recorded by  fMRI and is related to the level of neural firing ­ fMRI advantages: can create 3D image of brain, shows structure & activity,  nothing has to be injected, spatial resolution is better ­ fMRI pictures show the BOLD signal, not neural activity. Many neural activities  in the brain occur too quickly to capture in a scan. ­ Magnetoencephalography: ­ Magnetoencephalography (MEG): a technique for recording changes  produced in magnetic fields on the surface of the scalp by changes in underlying  patterns of neural activity ­ Temporal Resolution: ability of a recording technique to detect differences in  time (ex. to pinpoint when an event occurred) ­ Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: ­ Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS): a technique for disrupting the  activity in an area of the cortex by creating a magnetic field under a coil  positioned next to the skull; the effect of the disruption on cognition is assessed to  clarify the function of the affected area of the cortex 5.2 Recording Human Psychophysiological Activity ­ Scalp Electroencephalography: ­ Electroencephalography (EEG): a measure of the gross electrical activity of  the brain through disk­shaped electrodes, which in humans are usually taped to  the surface of the scalp ­ Some EEG waves associated with different states of consciousness, others with different pathologies (ei. epilepsy)   ­ Alpha Waves: regular, 8­ to 12­ per second, high amplitude EEG waves  that typically occur during relaxed wakefulness and just before falling  asleep ­ EEG signals decrease in amplitude as they get further from their source.  Measuring signal strength in different parts of head can help identify  signal origin. ­ Event­Related Potentials (ERPs): the EEG waves that regularly accompany  certain psychological events ­ Sensory Evoked Potential: a change in the electrical activity of the  brain (eg. In the cortical EEG) that is elicited by the momentary  presentation of a sensory stimulus ­ Signal Averaging: a method of increasing the signal­to­noise ratio by reducing  background noise ­ Muscle Tension: ­ At any given time, several fibers in each resting muscle are likely to be  contracting. Anxious/highly aroused individuals tend to display high resting levels  of tension in their muscles. ­ Electromyography: a procedure for measuring muscle tension by recording the  gross electrical discharge of muscles ­ Eye Movement: ­ electrooculography: a technique for recording eye movements through  electrodes placed around the eye ­ Based on the fact that there is a steady potential difference between the front  (positive) and back (negative) of the eyeball ­ Measures change in potential when eye moves. Measures direction & distance of  movement ­ Skin Conductance: ­ Skin Conductance Level (SCL): the steady level of skin conductance  associated with a particular situation (average, ongoing level) ­ Skin Conductance Response (SCR): the transient change in skin conductance  associated with a brief experience ­ Cardiovascular Activity: ­ Heart Rate  ▯­  Electrocardiogram (ECG): a recording of the electrical signals  associated with heartbeats.  ­ Average healthy adult HR = 70 beats/min ­ Blood Pressure: ­ Hypertension: chronically high blood pressure ­ Blood Volume: ­ Plethysmography: any technique for measuring changes in the volume  of blood in a part of the body ­ Ex. shining a light on a piece of tissue. More blood = more blood  absorbed. 5.3 Invasive Physiological Research Methods ­ Stereotaxic Surgery ­ Placing a device deep in the brain ­ Stereotaxic Atlas: a series of maps representing the 3D structure of the brain  that is used to determine coordinates for stereotaxic surgery ­ Bregma: the point on the surface of the skull where 2 of the major sutures  intersect, commonly used as a reference point in stereotaxic surgery on rodents ­ Stereotexic Instrument: a device for performing stereotaxic surgery, composed  of 2 parts: a head holder & an electrode holder (holds device to be inserted) ­ Lesion Methods: ­ Part of brain is removed, damaged, or destroyed and behaviour changes studied. ­ Aspiration Lesions: ­ Aspiration: a lesion technique in which tissue is drawn off by suction  through the fine tip of a glass pipette ­ Usually used if surgeon can directly see the tissue/has access to it with a  pipette ­ Radio­Frequency Lesions:  ­ radio frequency passed through stereotaxic electrode. Heat from  frequency and duration determine size/shape of lesion ­ Knife Cuts: used to eliminate conduction in a nerve tract ­ Cryogenic Blockade:  ­ Cryogenic Blockade: the temporary elimination of neural activity in an  area of the brain by cooling the area with a cryoprobe ­ Interpreting Lesion Effects:  ­ Damaging only a small part of the amygdala and many of its surrounding  structures is still called an “amygdala lesion” ­ Bilateral and Unilateral Lesions: ­ Behavioural changes of unilateral lesions (one side of the brain) much  milder than those of bilateral lesions (both sides) ­ Electrical Stimulation: ­ Electrical stimulation usually delivered from 2 tips of a bipolar electrode. ­ Weak current immediately increases neural firing ­ Behavioural effects often opposite to lesions ­ Behaviour depends on current details, test environment, area of brain ­ Invasive Electrophysiological Recording Methods: ­ Intracellular Unit Recording: measures 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 271

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit