Textbook Notes (367,969)
Canada (161,538)
LAW 122 (618)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2 - Law 122.docx

8 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law and Business
Course
LAW 122
Professor
Robert Meiklejohn
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 2  Litigation – attempting to resolve a dispute through a court process  ­ Litigation is frequent, but actually going through trial is not frequent  Definitions:  ­ Plaintiff ­ Defendant  ­ Action  Who can Sue and Be Sued? ­ Special cases: o Children  ▯children can sue and be sued, but they must be represented by a   parent or litigation guardian o Adults with special needs ­ Organizations o Unincorporated organizations, such as clubs, amateur teams, and  community groups, are generally not recognized in law as “persons” o Generally cannot sue or be sued o Members can sue or be sued as individuals  Exception:  ­ Governments o Historically, it was not possible to sue the government. However,  legislation has now made it possible to use the government under some  circumstances  Class Actions ­ Purpose o Multiple claims against single defendant joined together in one action o Small claimants able to share costs of litigation against large defendant  Examples: • Product liability (e.g. defective breast implants) • Mass torts (e.g. toxins spread by an industrial disaster) • Banks (e.g. excess charges on chequing accounts) Class Actions: Requirements ­ Common issues among all class members ­ Representative plaintiff who will act in interests of all members of the class ­ Notification to all potential members of the class (show workable plan… frequently published in newspapers and magazines) ­ Preferable procedure to individual claims ­ Certification by court to allow class action to proceed Case 1: George vs. Shark Loans  ­ Class action would help here o Ask the court for permission to join all the claims against Shark Loans in  one proceeding o Representative plaintiff o Sue for value of all claims combined Case 2: Dealing with Complexities: Sub­classes in a Town Terrorized by Tained Water ­ If company liable in one case, likely liable in the others ­ Determination of company’s negligence can be generally applied to all class  members, then the compensation for specific types of injuries can be decided  separately  Class Actions/ Costs ­ As with all legal class proceedings, someone has to pay for the costs of the action,  including the lawyers’ fees ­ Representative plaintiff alone is liable for costs; other members of the class are  not liable for costs of litigation Legal Representation ­ Options o Self­representation o Lawyer o Paralegal  Self­representation ­ Party may represent himself or herself ­ Usually advisable only in simple matters o Self­represented party often has a “fool for a lawyer and a fool for a  client” Representation by Lawyers ­ Lawyers are required to complete training ­ Governed by provincial law societies o Establish and apply Codes of Conduct o Investigate and punish misconduct o Administer assurance funds for victims of misconduct ­ Lawyers must carry professional liability insurance ­ Communications are confidential and privileged  Representation by Paralegals ­ Advantages o Usually very knowledgable in specialized areas o Generally less expensive o Often more accessible ­ Disadvantages ­ Since 2007, Law Society of Upper Canada has licensed paralegals in Ontario ­ New paralegals must now: o Train at an approved institution o Complete examinations o Abide by the code of conduct o Carry liability insurance ­ Restrictions on paralegals: o Confined to certain types of work, e.g. representation in Small Claims  court, administrative tribunals o Cannot work on a contingency fee basis  The Litigation Process: An overview of the Life of a Legal Action Cause of Action occurs ­ Action must be commenced within applicable limitation period (2 years) Pleadings ­ The parties exchange various filings that outline the issues that they will raise at  trial and the facts upon which they will rely o Drafted by party o Issued by court o Served on opposing party ­ Parties o Plaintiff  = person making complaint o Defendant = person being complained about  ­ Statement of claim o Used by plaintiff to start claim  Some provinces use writ before statement of claim o Outlines dispute and states desired remedies ­ Statement of Defence ­ Counterclaim ­ Reply o Used by plaintiff to dispute contents of statement of defence ­ Demand for particulars o Used by either party to demand additional information  Pre­trail Activity in Litigation ­ Examinations for discovery o Information gathered under oath outside court ­ Pre­trail conference o Judge meets with parties to summarize case ­ Mandatory mediation program o Currently operating in Ontario only ­ Settlement o Parties may avoid trial by agreeing to resolution  Trial ­ Burden of proof o Criminal: beyond a reasonable doubt o Civil: balance of probabilities ­ Standard outcomes o Criminal: guilty or not guilty o Civil: liable or not liable  ▯remedies (can’t be charged or guilty in civil  court…you’re held liable. In civil court you are being sued) Remedies in Litigation ­ Compensatory damages ­ Punititve damages: punishing  ­ Nominal damages: symbolic award of money to show the defendant they are  wrong ­ Specific performance: compel someone to go through with a contract ­ Injunction: can be seen when dealing with copyright matters ­ Recission: a court terminates a contract  Enforcement in Litigation ­ Winning judgment vs. enforcing judgment o No relief unless judgment debtor actually pays ­ Enforcement techniques o Garnish income o Seize and sell assets Appeals  ­ Parties o Appellant = party disputing decision below o Respondent = party supporting decision below ­ Appeal process o No new witnesses or evidence o Focus on law rather than fact  Overrule any error of law  Overrule only palpable and overriding error of fact ­ Appeal courts o Three or more judges 
More Less

Related notes for LAW 122

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit