Chapter 15.docx

5 Pages
97 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL111H5
Professor
Charles Smith
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 15: Legislatures ­ Symbols of popular representation in politics  ­ They don’t make major decisions ­ Don’t even initiate proposals for laws ­ Significance arises from their representative role o “Join society to the legal structure of the authority in the state” o They’re representative bodies ­ Help mobilize consent for the system of rule ­ Legislature­ multimember representative body which considers public issues and  gives assent on behalf of a political community that extends beyond the executive  authority, to binding measures of public policy ­ Legislatures gain more political weight from performing this function of standing  for the people  ­ Assemblies of meetings became modern legislatures  ­ Link society and state ­ Representation is mot obvious function of legislatures  ­ Oversight is an important function of all legislatures that helps understand the role  of contemporary governance ­ Assemblies are fund in most authoritarian regimes  ­ Contribute to detailed governance and broad expressions of the popular will Structure ­ 2 things every assembly in the world has: o How many members it has and how many chambers it has of which it is  compromised  Size ­ Size of assembly indicated by number of members in the important lower  chamber reflects the country’s population ­ Size is poor measure of strength ­ Big assemblies sometimes cant act cohesively because of their size ­ Communist parties prefer larger legislatures because its easier to control  ­ Smaller chambers (100) offer the chance for everyone to have a say Number of Chambers ­ Unicameral legislatures­ one chamber  o Smaller democracies embrace this  ­ Bicameral legislatures­ two chambers o Found in larger countries  o Second chamber voices the component states  ­ Single chamber easier  ­ Bicameralists say upper chamber offers checks and balances  ­ Second chamber can also offer review  ­ Upper chambers power to delay can be seen as positive ­ Adding a second house can also share the work ­ But usually lower chamber dominated ­ Weak bicameralism­ lower chamber dominates upper house, providing primary  focus for government accountability as in most parliamentary systems  o For clarity, one chamber must be in charge ­ Strong Bicameralism­ few federations where the chambers are more balances,  seen in the USA, presidential governments  Selection of the Second Chamber ­ Indirect election ­ Direct election ­ Appointment­ usually by the government  Functions ­ Representation o Represent society to government, goals of the party under whose label  they were elected  o Descriptive representation­ present when the members of a representative  body resemble the represent in given characteristics such as ethnicity and  gender  o Substantive representation­ representatives act on behalf of and interest of  those they represent. Ex. Female legislator can reflect interest of male  continuants but cannot serve as their descriptive representation  ­ Deliberation  o Debating matters of moment (national importance) is the classic function  of Britain’s house of commons  o Members were meant to be trustees of nations o Trustee­ responsible for protecting property and interests of others  o Debating legislature­ floor debate is the central activity, major issues  addressed and parties gain or loose ground o Committee­based legislature­ American congress, most work takes place  in committees, policy discussion  ­ Legislation  o Most bulls come from the government but the legislature still approves  them and may make amendments in committee  ­ Authorizing expenditures  o Parliaments role is normally reactive, approving or rejecting a budget  prepared by the government  o Revisionary expenditures­ the default budget which takes effect should the  legislature fail to approve a new one in time (usually last years budget) ­ Making governments  o In parliamentary systems, government emerges from the assembly and  must retain its confidence ­ Scrutinizing the executive  o Oversight of the government activity and policy is growing in importance  and is a task well suited to the assembly’s committees  o Interpellation­ enquiry of the government, interrupting normal business  which is followed by a short debate and usually a vote with the assembly’s  satisfaction with the answer given  o Emergency debates­ higher profile  o Votes of Confidence­ ultimate test which a legislature can pose to  executive (how much confidence you have in leader) Committe
More Less

Related notes for POL111H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit