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Chapter 21

Chapter 21

5 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB45H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell

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Chapter 21
Habit Reversal Procedures
Habit reversal procedures are used to decrease the frequency of
undesirable habit behavior
Habit behaviors often do not interfere to any great extent with the
persons social functioning; they tend to be more of an annoyance to the
person or to significant others in the persons life
When the habit behavior occurs frequently or with high intensity, the
person may seek treatment for the problem and may be seen as a
habit disorder
Defining Habit Behaviors
Nervous Habits
oNail-biting is a common type of nervous habit
oOther examples include twirling or stroking hair, tapping a
pencil, chewing on a pen, cracking knuckles, thumb-sucking etc.
oInvolve repetitive, manipulative behaviors that are believed to
be most likely to occur when the person experiences heightened
nervous tension
oBelieved to diminish nervous tension; in some cases, they may
serve a self-stimulatory function
oCan occur while other voluntary activities are occurring
oIn most cases, they involve the use of hands; may also involve
oral behaviors such as lip-biting
oMany nervous habits do not cause any problems for the person
unless the frequency or the intensity of the behavior becomes
extreme
oBody-focused repetitive behavior problems nervous habits that
result in physical damage or physical damage or negative social
evaluations
Motor and Vocal Tics
oRepetitive, jerking movements of a particular muscle group in
the body
oUsually involve muscles in the neck or face but may also involve
the shoulders, arms, legs or torso
oFacial tics may involve squinting, forceful blinking, eyebrow
raising etc.
oMotor tics may include movements of the head forward,
backward, or to the side
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oMotor tics are believed to be associated with heightened muscle
tension
oIts not uncommon for children to develop simple motor tics and
then grow out of them
oMotor tics are a problem when they are long-standing or
extreme in frequency or intensity
oA vocal tic is a repetitive vocal sound that does not serve a social
function
oEx. Throat clearing when there is no reason to clear the throat
and coughing when the person is not sick
oTourettes disorder is a tic disorder involving multiple motor
and vocal tics; caused by a complex interaction of genetic and
neurobiological factors, as well as environmental events; it is
diagnosed when two or more tics (including at least one vocal
tic) occur for at least 1 year considered a lifelong disorder with
an onset in childhood
Stuttering
oA type of speech dysfluency in which the person repeats words
or syllables, prolongs the sound of a word or syllable, or blocks
on a word (makes no sound for a period of time while trying to
say a word)
oMost children grow out of it without a problem
oVarying degrees of severity sometime it is barely noticeable; in
others, it interferes with speech production
*All three have been treated with habit reversal procedures
Habit Reversal Procedures
The procedure is implemented in a therapy session with the client who
exhibits the habit disorder
Awareness training:
oThe client is taught to describe the behaviors that are involved
in the habit
oAfter learning the behavioral definition of the habit, the client
learns to identify when the habit occurs or when it is about to
occur
Competing response training:
oClient learns a competing response (a behavior incompatible
with the habit behavior) and practices the competing response
in session after each occurrence of the habit
oNext, the client imagines the situation in which he/she will use
the competing response outside the session to inhibit the habit
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Chapter 21 Habit Reversal Procedures Habit reversal procedures are used to decrease the frequency of undesirable habit behavior Habit behaviors often do not interfere to any great extent with the persons social functioning; they tend to be more of an annoyance to the person or to significant others in the persons life When the habit behavior occurs frequently or with high intensity, the person may seek treatment for the problem and may be seen as a habit disorder Defining Habit Behaviors Nervous Habits o Nail-biting is a common type of nervous habit o Other examples include twirling or stroking hair, tapping a pencil, chewing on a pen, cracking knuckles, thumb-sucking etc. o Involve repetitive, manipulative behaviors that are believed to be most likely to occur when the person experiences heightened nervous tension o Believed to diminish nervous tension; in some cases, they may serve a self-stimulatory function o Can occur while other voluntary activities are occurring o In most cases, they involve the use of hands; may also involve oral behaviors such as lip-biting o Many nervous habits do not cause any problems for the person unless the frequency or the intensity of the behavior becomes extreme o Body-focused repetitive behavior problems nervous habits that result in physical damage or physical damage or negative social evaluations Motor and Vocal Tics o Repetitive, jerking movements of a particular muscle group in the body o Usually involve muscles in the neck or face but may also involve the shoulders, arms, legs or torso o Facial tics may involve squinting, forceful blinking, eyebrow raising etc. o Motor tics may include movements of the head forward, backward, or to the side www.notesolution.com
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