Textbook Notes (369,035)
Canada (162,359)
Psychology (9,698)
PSYB32H3 (1,174)
Chapter 4

Chapter 4.docx

6 Pages
123 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB32H3
Professor
Diane Mangalindan
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 4­ Infancy: Sensation, Perception, and Learning The Newborn ­ Neonate: newborn A New Babies reflexes ­ Reflex: humans involuntary response to external stimuli. One of the first  responses to appear. Survival benefits (not always known).  ­ Abnormalities in reflexes can indicate visual, hearing problems. Neurological  problems are indicated by absent, unsusually strong or fail to disappear reflexes.  ­ At birth doctors use these to test the central nervous system.  ­ (table 4­1, pg 119).  Infant States ­ Infant state: recurring pattern of arousal ranging from alert, vigorous, wakeful  activity to quiet, regular sleep.  ­ They tell us that human behaviour is predictable from baby, humans are passive  and respond to their environments.  ­ Studies suggest that state of arousal patterns start to form before birth.  o Sleep ­ on average sleeps 70% of the time. By 4w the baby takes less naps but sleep is  longer. By 8w baby is sleeping more at night than day.  ­ Baby becomes less fussy as they gain more control over state.  ­ Varies by culture. Kipsigis babies take more naps as they get older. Kenyan babies  take longer to sleep through the night. Kip. Parents sleep with babies, same with  other cultures. This can prevent risk factors of SIDS (sudden infant death  syndrome: death of a baby under 1(unexplained and spontaneous).  ­ REM sleep: rapid eye momement slee. Rapid jerky movement of the eyes.  Dreaming. Babies spend 50% of sleep in REM as adults only spend 20%. Without  REM sleep ppl tend to become irritable.  ­ Autostimulation theory: during REM sleep the infants brain stimulates itself,  which stimulates early development in the central nervous system.  ­ (table 4­2, pg 121 Newborn infant states). (Figure 4­1, pg 121, infant sleep  patterns).   Sudden infant death syndrome ­ most common between 2 and 4 months, rarelty occurs after 6m.  ­ More likely in babies that already had problems or bad envir.  ­ Apnea, choking, underdeveloped brain stem (controls breathing), nasal or  breathing blokages. Failure to transition smoothly from reflexive to voluntary  reflexes will put them at greater risk. Moniters can prevent SIDS but false alarms  place a lot of stress on parents. Babies shouldn’t sleep on soft matresses with  pillows, they should sleep on their backs. Co sleeping declines rates, however the  pediactic society does not recommend. o Crying ­ earliest means of communicating . Basic: hunger, among other factors, starts  arrhythmically at low intensity and gets louder and more rhythmic. Anger: the cry,  rest inhale vary in length, sgements of crying are longer, due to taking away toy or  pacifier. Pain: loud from the start, long cry, long silence (holding breathe)  followed by short gasping inhales. Caused by discomfort, or pain.  ­ Mothers are better at determining what they want but is also correlated with how  much time father spends with baby.  ­ Early months baby cries for physiological reasons. By 3­4 m they cry for  psychological.  ­ Some ppl say that attending to all crying may increase crying in future, others say  that knowledge of the parents being dependable decreasing crying. Others even  suggest that only distress cries should result in attention.  ­ Crying can be a tool altering abnormalities in development. (e.g. colic: prolonged  unexplained crying in infant (20% of infants 2­4w of age). It is harmless, however  may indicate hernia or ear infection. It is a high pitched, urgent, piercing cry.  How to Soothe an Infant o Infants abilities to soothe themselves ­ sucking, it reduces babies distress, sucking on certain things are more effective  than others. Eye contact from parent increased effects in 4w old. ­ By 4 w the infant relies on caregiver to soothe them.  o How parents soothe their babies ­ pacifier, rocking, massaging, swaddling,  ­ other cultures see (box 4.2) Evaluating the Newborns Health and Consequences ­ Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale: used to measure an infants sensory and  perceptual capabilities, motor development, range of states, ability to regulate  these states. Also indicate whether brain and central nervous system are properly  regulating autonomic responsivity. It is used to see any risks of infant  developmental problems or neurological impairment. Cross culturallty indicates  parent­ child interactions. Infants motor abilities are influnecd by cultural  practices and routines.  How cultures affect crying and soothability ­ some cultures, swaddle, others carry them on their body. Some put their child on a  cradleboard. Each culture cries and is soothed in different ways, however it could  just be associated with the genes linked to that culture.  The Infants sensory and Perceptual Capaities ­ Sensations: detection of stimuli by sensory receptors. ­ Perception: interpretation of sensations in order to make meaningful.  ­ Babies sensory and perceptual systems may be biologicallt prepared to process  and respond to social stimuli. This prep is adaptive.  Unlocking the secrets of babies sensory capabilities ­ reseaerchers rely on autonomic nervous system (involuntary bodily fucntions;  heart rate, breathing).  Or motor responses which give cues about sensory ability  (e.g. burn­> leg kick).  ­ Measuring sucking patterns. Uses violation­of­expectation method. If baby is  shown an impossible event and the babies sucking rate slows or stops you ca  conclude that the baby is responding to an event that is different.  ­ Visual performance method: preferred by frantz. Measure the length of time they  spend attending to different stimuli ­ Habituation does occur: the process by which an ind. Reacts with less and less  intensity to a repeatedly presented stimuli, eventually responding faintly or not at  all.  Hearing: babies are good listeners ­ newborns hearing is extremely developed and can be measured from birth ­ even before birth they may hear sounds or vibrations in the uterus.  ­ Sound must be louder for a newborn, they are less sensitive to low pitch,  ­ Motherese: more likely to capture babies attention.  ­ Audoitory localization: ability to determine from where in space a sound is  originating. Babies are good at this. Can also discriminate between approaching  and not, and slow and fast.  ­ Babies are sensitive to melody changing.  ­ In early stages babies can infants are equally edept ar processing either scale type,  depending on their culture they  become better at one.  ­ Infants listening to music does not increase their intelligence (based on research). ­ Babies 2 years old prefer human voice over other noise.  ­ 4­7 months prefer infant directed play songs and lullabies. They have increased  arousal when mom sings.  Vision: how babies see their worlds ­ newborns can detect changes in brightness, movement, and follow object with  their eyes.  o The clarity of infants vision ­ visual acuity: sharpness of vision; the clarity with which fine details can be  discerned.  ­ At 1 month babies vision is 20/200­ 20/800. By 6m to a year it is at normal adult  range.  ­ Testing: how sensitive a baby is to visual detail such as width or densisty of a se
More Less

Related notes for PSYB32H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit