Textbook Notes (368,460)
Canada (161,892)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYC51H3 (7)
Chapter 1

Chapter 1.docx

6 Pages
107 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC51H3
Professor
Jonathan Cant
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 1 • Light, eye and brain  o At the very first layer of neurons in the visual system, there is a trade­off between  sensitivity to light and spatial resolution   This layer is sensitive to lower levels of light but the cost is lower spatial  resolution • This is because once the outputs from different points on the retina are  pooled, the information has been lost concerning which of those points  were stimulated and which were not  o Good resolution can be maintained by limiting the number of photoreceptor outputs that  converge on later cells but this results in poor sensitivity to low levels of light   To offset this trade­off, visual system has rods (greater individual sensitivity and  their extensive convergence onto bipolar collector cells) and ganglion cells (low  resolution image of the world that persists under conditions low illumination)  which have different specialties   System of cones with much more limited convergence to give us a high resolution  image of the world provided there is ample light  o A consequence of color visions’ reliance on cones is that we are effectively color blind in  low illumination  • The retinal ganglion cells o Before image has even left the eye, it has undergone processing which removes levels  illumination and replaces it with a retinotopic map of differences  o “On­center” cells are excited by light in a small of location in the visual field and  inhibited by light in the immediately adjacent regions  “Off­center” cells show the opposite reactions to light in center   Useful groundwork for eventual perception of objects because objects are not  associated particular level of brightness but with differences in brightness  between themselves and their background o Image is split into M (magnocellular/parasol) and P (parvocellular/midget) channels of  the lateral geniculate nucleus to which they project   M ganglion cells receive input from a relatively large number of photoreceptors,  giving them, giving them good light sensitivity  • Larger with broader axons and faster nerve conduction velocities and  their responses are more transient than those of P cells  • Temporal resolution of the M cells equips them well for the perception of  motion as well as detection of sudden stimulus onsets for purposes of  redirecting spatial attention   P cells receive input from a relatively small number of photoreceptors, giving  them good spatial resolution   • Show color selectivity whereas M cells do not  • Spatial resolution and color sensitivity of the P cells equips them for a  major role in object recognition  o The optic nerve splits into  number of pathways, two of which play the predominant roles  in visual perception   The largest pathway and the most important for human vision is called the  geniculostriate pathway because it includes the lateral geniculate nucleus and  striate cortex   The other important perceptual pathway out of the eye is the collicular pathway  which includes the superior colliculus and the pulvinar • Only converges with geniculostriate pathway at visual association cortex • Phylogenetically older visual pathway  • The Lateral Geniculate Nucleus  o There are 2 layers of magnocellular layers and 4 layers of parvocellular layers on top of  those  o There is one LGN in each cerebral hemisphere and each receives input from both eyes  although each eye’s input remains segregated in different layers of the LGN   Contralateral eye sends input to layers 1, 4 and 6 and the ipsalateral eye sends  input to layers 2, 3 and 5 o Functional characteristics of neurons in these layers are similar to those of Mp and P cells  of retina from which they receive input   Neurons in all layers show a center­surround organization  o Difference between the responses of retinal ganglion cells and cells in the LGN:   LGN cells may have more powerful inhibitory surrounds than retinal ganglion  cells  o Function of LGN is purely speculative   Maybe a possible modulatory role for the LGN, suggested by its connectivity  with other brain areas   Well­situated to gate or amplify visual input to cortex s a function of both level of  arousal and current cortical state   Possible that LGN serves a developmental purpose, facilitating the wiring of the  eye with the physically distant cortex in early life by providing  waystation  o Conservation of retinotopy allows easy communication between neurons representing  neighboring parts of the visual field and such local interactions are crucial to a huge  number of visual functions  o Retinotopy also provides a common framework within which the representation of an  object at one location can be co­indexed among disparate brain areas and facilitates the  wiring up of visual areas during development  o Parvocellular damage in monkeys has the most pronounced effect on color perception and  also affects form and depth perception at high spatial frequencies and low temporal  frequenceies  o Magnocellular damage has most pronounced effect on motion perception and also affects  form and depth perception at high temporal frequencies   Claim made that the M layer is that it is the locus of impairment in  developmental dyslexia  • The primary visual cortex  o The major cortical projection of visual information from LGN is to primary visual cortex,  striate cortex nd V1  Fibres linking LGN and primary visual cortex preserve retinoto
More Less

Related notes for PSYC51H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit