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Chapter 8

POL215Y1 Chapter Notes - Chapter 8: Tung Chee-Hwa, Chris Patten, Universal Suffrage


Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL215Y1
Professor
Lynette Ong
Chapter
8

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Ernie Tam
2011-11-02
How East Asians View Democracy-Chapter 8-The Case of Hong Kong
Hong Kong was a colonial country under the UK and then ruled by PRC.
Election procedures were determined by Beijing.
Modernization has produced readiness for democracy
The lack of complete democracy in HK is reflected by a lack of commitment
by its peoplethis is only true b/c there are many factors that affect the
commitment: such as the economic concerns etc…
Hong Kong’s Partial Democracy
From the 1980s, the only government body with elected members was under
British Colonial system, known as the Urban Council.
oUniversal suffrage was introduced in the 1980s.
Britain and China began to have negotiations over the future of HK. Agreed
that in 1984, that Britain would return HK to China only on the conditions that
HK gets to keep their democratic system in place.
o“One country” two system agreement.
Arrival of Chris Patten was HK’s last colonial governor produced several
democratic reforms.
oPatten introduced several Legislative Council elections.
oAll official and appointed seats in Legislative council were also
abolished.
Tung Chee Hwa was appointed to the position of chief executive of HKSAR,
undermining the previously established rule under Britain.
Basic Lawconcept of a gradual and orderly program of democratic
transition.
oAlls for the chief executive of HKSAR to be elected but Beijing would
not allow it.
Other failures of the HKSAR constitution
oNo introduction of bills related to public expenditure, constitutional
structure and operation of government
The chief executive as a result controlled the legislature and thus the
government as a whole.
oThere are also deep divisions in HK’s territory and thus prevented
mass democratic movement.
Partial democracyChallenge in democracy is not the improvement of the
democracy but the consolidation of it.
Democratic legitimacy- defined as citizens’ belief in the legitimacy of, or their
commitment to, democracy as the most preferred regime type will serve as a
critical condition of successful democratization when the opportunity comes.
HK is particularly attracted to the ideals of individual rights but not the idea
of having it completely consolidated since it might impede economic
advancement.
Corruption in HK was not rampant and in fact one of the best controlled in the
world.
HK residents definitely do not want authoritarian governments again.
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