Textbook Notes (378,537)
CA (167,156)
UTSG (10,973)
PSY (2,994)
PSY100H1 (1,839)
Chapter 10

Chapter 10 notes

15 Pages
36 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSY100H1
Professor
Michael Inzlicht

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 15 pages of the document.
Chapter 10
Emotions and Health
Elliot
oAfter a benign tumor was removed from Elliots head with some remaining
frontal lobe tissue left behind, he changed in a way that amazed many
oElliot displayed few emotional responses; he was not oblivious to his loss of
emotion, he was able to report that he knew the pictures were disturbing and
that before surgery he would have had an emotional response, but now he had
none.
oCases above Elliot provide ample evidence about the role of various brain
regions in producing and regulation emotional responses, and how we use
emotional information
Emotions are a primary source of motivation as we seek objects and activities
that makes us feel good and avoid doing or saying things that make us feel
bad
Sometimes our emotions can overwhelm us, as when we become stressed by
demands on our time
Decisions and judgments are affected by how people feel; emotions are
cognition which are completely intertwined.
Emotions: are immediate responses to environment events such as being cut
off in traffic
It is useful to distinguish emotion from mood
Mood: are diffuse and long-lasting emotional states that influence rather
than interrupt thought and behavior.
Mood reflects peoples perceptions of whether they have the personal
resources necessary to meet environmental demands
1
www.notesolution.com
As people become to be overwhelmed they become Stressed: a pattern of
behavioral and physiological responses to events that match or exceed an
organisms abilities
Health Psychology: is the field of psychology science concerned with the
events that affect physical well-being.
oIt is concerned with how people remain healthy when they become ill,
and what they can do to regain their health.
How are emotions Adaptive?
Negative and positive experiences guide behavior that increases the
probability of surviving and reproducing
Emotions are adaptive because they prepare and guide behaviours, such as
running away when your encounter something dangerous
Facial Expressions
Charles Darwin argued, that expressive characteristics were adaptive in all
forms of life, from the dogs hard stare and exposed teeth when defending its
land
Emotional expressions are powerful non verbal communication
The lower half of the face is more important than the upper half in
communicating emotion
In a class study Dunlap noted
oThe mouth better conveyed emotion that the eyes (positive effect),
however the eyes are extremely important for the communication of
emotion
oIf the whole face is presented at once, the mouth is the most important
in determining how people perceive the emotional expression
2
www.notesolution.com
The display of emotions alters behaviors in observers; you will avoid a person
who looks angry than one who is happy and cheerful
Emotions provide information to others as to how people are feeling and ; this
can prompt them to respond in certain ways
Facial Expression across cultures
Darwin argued that the face innately communicates emotions to others and
that these communications are understandable by all people, regardless of
culture.
This was tested will many countries, in which people were asked to identify
the emotional response on the photography’s of posed emotional expressions;
it was found the people from all countries could identify the expressions as
either anger, fear, happy, sad etc. ; this was also true for less remote areas
Display rules and Gender
The situations in which emotions are displayed differ substantially in
different cultures
Display rules: govern how and when emotions are exhibited; these rules are learnt
by socialization and dictate which emotions are suitable to a given situation (help to
explain cultural stereotypes ie. Black people are loud and rude)
There are gender differences in display rules that guide emotional expression
Men and women vary in their emotional expressiveness; women are related
with care giving, nurturance and interpersonal relationships, whereas
emotions associated with men are related to competitiveness, dominance and
defensiveness
Although, women may be linked with intense emotions, this might not reflect
societal norms about how women are supposed to be feel
Emotions Serve Cognitive Functions
Peoples moods can alter ongoing mental processes
3
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Chapter 10 Emotions and Health Elliot o After a benign tumor was removed from Elliots head with some remaining frontal lobe tissue left behind, he changed in a way that amazed many o Elliot displayed few emotional responses; he was not oblivious to his loss of emotion, he was able to report that he knew the pictures were disturbing and that before surgery he would have had an emotional response, but now he had none. o Cases above Elliot provide ample evidence about the role of various brain regions in producing and regulation emotional responses, and how we use emotional information Emotions are a primary source of motivation as we seek objects and activities that makes us feel good and avoid doing or saying things that make us feel bad Sometimes our emotions can overwhelm us, as when we become stressed by demands on our time Decisions and judgments are affected by how people feel; emotions are cognition which are completely intertwined. Emotions: are immediate responses to environment events such as being cut off in traffic It is useful to distinguish emotion from mood Mood: are diffuse and long-lasting emotional states that influence rather than interrupt thought and behavior. Mood reflects peoples perceptions of whether they have the personal resources necessary to meet environmental demands 1 www.notesolution.com As people become to be overwhelmed they become Stressed: a pattern of behavioral and physiological responses to events that match or exceed an organisms abilities Health Psychology: is the field of psychology science concerned with the events that affect physical well-being. o It is concerned with how people remain healthy when they become ill, and what they can do to regain their health. How are emotions Adaptive? Negative and positive experiences guide behavior that increases the probability of surviving and reproducing Emotions are adaptive because they prepare and guide behaviours, such as running away when your encounter something dangerous Facial Expressions Charles Darwin argued, that expressive characteristics were adaptive in all forms of life, from the dogs hard stare and exposed teeth when defending its land Emotional expressions are powerful non verbal communication The lower half of the face is more important than the upper half in communicating emotion In a class study Dunlap noted o The mouth better conveyed emotion that the eyes (positive effect), however the eyes are extremely important for the communication of emotion o If the whole face is presented at once, the mouth is the most important in determining how people perceive the emotional expression 2 www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit