Textbook Notes (368,035)
Canada (161,583)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC101Y1 (470)
Chapter 13

SOC 203-Chapter 13 textbook notes.docx

2 Pages
123 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC101Y1
Professor
Irving Zeitlin
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 13 textbook notes •  Comte’s positive philosophy was a conscious attempt to discredit what he had  termed “negative” philosophy  • The negative critical philosophy that emerged had provided had provided itself a  formidable weapon in the hands of the rising bourgeoisie in its struggle against  the older classes of the theological feudal order • The proletarians instead of finding their place in the new organic society and  adjusting peacefully to it, as Comte desired, were being agitated to struggle for  the transformation of the existing society  • The working class must adjust to the present stage  • Progress was best made by reconciling (make peace) the conflicting tendencies  and classes; by educating all classes of society – and especially the lower classes­  to take their proper place in the new, hierarchically organized society and to  resign themselves to their condition. ** This is what the new positive science  taught and this was to be its chief function: to achieve an organic conflict­free  social order  • Marx’s concept of the natural man – the individual human being, his needs, and  his potential for development  • Marx believed that man is infinitely perfectible  ▯Mans essential powers are  unlimited in their capacity for development  • The existing system, capitalism, was not only preventing the fulfillment of his  potential (man), it was even depriving him of his animal needs­fresh air, food,  sex etc. Hunger for example, was a condition of deprivation imposed by other  men (the bourgeoise). Therefore marx condemned the capitalists system for its  effect on individual human beings • Instead of men developing his essential human powers, man was being deformed  and thus becoming something less than animal  • Alienation for Hegel was exclusively a phenomenon of the mind – that is the  condition in which man’s own powers appear as independent forces or entities  controlling his actions  • Feuerbach had elaborated the enlightenment view of religion as an “illusion”  ▯he   maintained that God is a creation of the human imagination. The divine is a  symbolic expression of humanities unfulfilled promises and aspirations; humans  unconsciously project their ideals unto hypothetical beings, which they then treat  as sacred divine. They thus come to worship the product of their own minds  • Marx  ▯religion is the product of social alienation  ▯it is the domination,  opp
More Less

Related notes for SOC101Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit