Textbook Notes (368,315)
Canada (161,809)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC205H1 (16)
Chapter

Week 10 Readings.docx

5 Pages
129 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC205H1
Professor
Brent Berry
Semester
Spring

Description
Week 10 Readings:  Chapter 9: Gillis—Cities and Social Pathology Introduction:  • People flourish at middle levels of population density and suffer more at the extremes – prolonged exposure  to either high density (crowding) or low density (isolation) is associated with distress • The relationship between population density and pathological reactions is a U­shaped curve  • When the provision of immoral and illegal goods and services cluster in one section of the city, we call it a  deviant service centre • Rates of pathological behaviours and conditions will be most prevalent in rural regions and in particular  sections of the largest cities  • Rates will be lowest in mid­sized cities, where the presence of state control is more widespread and  complete The Image of the City • Glassner argues that in their search for drama, the media have created a ‘culture of fear’  ▯large cities  produce more murders and other kinds of disreputable behaviours than do smaller ones. This shouldn’t be  newsworthy in itself because there are simply more people in larger centres. To fairly calculate the  likelihood of victimization, one has to divide the number of offences by the number of people inhabiting a  location • **Have to look at the rates because urban cities will get an unfair reputation as dangerous History: Urbanization and the Civilization of Europe  • Except during past 5­6 decades, serious crime has been in decline in the West since the waning of Middle  Ages. The cities at the end of the Middle Ages contained more diligent populations in specialized  occupations or trades, which were controlled by guilds and court of law • Urbane self­control became part of the cultural capital of the city, increasing the ‘trustworthiness of the  social environment’, which is social capital  Population Density and Social Pathology  • Wirth defined ‘urban’ in terms of density and size as well as the ‘social heterogeneity’  • Calhoun first used the term social pathology: the behaviours in the high­density pens of his experiment on  rats. The behaviours included infanticide, aggression and sexual assault, asexuality, careless mothering, and  apparent depression  o These behaviours had the effect of limiting the growth of the population  • Behavioural sink: the growth of unusual behaviours under conditions of high density in Calhoun’s  experiment with rats Non­linearity  • However, the relationship between density and negative consequences is non­linear. Sensory deprivation  may have consequences just as negative as overstimulation does, so population density can be too low as  well as too high.  • One might conclude that moderate levels of density must be ideal, but people sometimes prefer low  stimulation (ex. youth and elderly prefer stimulation of high density in downtown, while mid­life parents  more comfortable in lower densities)  Allure of high­density environments:  • People seem to like high density; they line up and pay high prices for the privilege of crowding at concerts,  sports events, etc. This suggests that the negative impact of density (at least for a specific period of time),  negative effects are more than offset by an allure associated with high density • Take Calhoun’s experiment cautiously: his experiment showed that population density may have a dramatic  effect on rats in an experimental setting and the causal direction is clear. But among people the causal  direction is unclear. Persons with high levels of psychological strain may choose or be forced by economic  factors to live in high­density environments, including cities  • Among humans, relationship between density and social pathology is also non­linear o Strain and distress shows up at very low and moderately high levels of density and at least at  moderate levels, density seems to interact with other variables  City size and Deviant Subcultures  • Size matters  ▯because specialization, co­ordination and economies of scale • Positive: large concentrations of people enable a high level of specialization in the supplying of goods and  services. This increases productivity organizationally without anyone having to work harder, and large scale  production can take advantage of economics of scale  • Residents of large cities enjoy more specialized and higher quality medical care which translates into lower  rates of physical pathology and morality • Dispersed populations in rural areas can’t provide economic support for much beyond everyday gods and  services  • Large concentrations of people in urban areas often support unusual or deviant activities (ex. ranging from  collection of tropical fish to sex toys)  Social disorganization and the City  • According to Simmel, urbanites face the need to protect themselves from the overstimulation and  distraction of the press of people around them. Successful urbanites do this by learning various coping  mechanisms such as cocooning (withdrawing into oneself), controlling motional response and expression,  watching TV to disengage from surroundings and buffer the impact of density • This urbanism is a set of culturally transmitted techniques and argues why a blasé attitude and emotional  withdrawal characterize the way of life for city dwellers  • However in the rural, the psychological stress of the assembly line and rush hour traffic may be more than  matched by the isolation, dangers, and physical and mental stresses associated with farming, fishing, and  making do with limited resources in rural areas  • Several reasons for the disorganization of community and control:  o City folk are more tolerant of differences and non­conformity, draw shaper distinction between  friends and stranger o Also, design factors in the city like high walls, underground parking areas inhibit or prevent  surveillance control  o Newman  ▯physical environment (urban architecture) prevents or permits action rather than  motivating it Deviance Service Centres:  • Although a deviance service centre may generate income, it places the community on the moral as well as  the physical periphery of the economic system  • Once established, deviance service centres attract patrons from a wide geographic area which may further  increase crime rates  City size and social pathology:  • Size brings benefits, but only up to a point. After that, additional benefits are redundant and more than  offset by the costs of size: difficulties in negotiating the greater distances to cover and problems arising  from the volume of traffic, noise, pollution and even the bombardment of choices • Fear of crime is directly related to city size; however larger cities are also more likely to have universities,  specialized medical care, museums, a zoo, etc.  • Civilization theory maintains that throughout most of history, rural areas, not cities, had higher rates of  serious crimes because the latter developed more effective systems of control. However, civilization  theorists acknowledge that urban areas seem to have become more violent in the past half century • As urbanization increased and cities grew in size, something may have occurred to stop the civilizing  process within them. This could have happened on a widespread basis. However, disorganization theory  suggests that the breakdown of moral order occurred primarily within the most populous cities and within  specific sectors • The end result would be a non­linear relationship between the size of localities and rates of crime, with  institutional control weakest in rural areas  • Non­linearity suggests that certain rural regions and small towns may lack the population or resources  necessary to maintain institutions of support and control to curtail more spontaneous outburst and higher  rates of passionate violence • In rural areas, young males have a greater tendency to resist control and engage in criminal activity are  probably overrepresented in rural regions (ex. occupations as farming, fishing, mining, etc.)  • On the urban side, modern metropolitan centres are more likely to conta
More Less

Related notes for SOC205H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit