Textbook Notes (368,588)
Canada (161,988)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC220H1 (14)
Chapter 20

Age - GG Ch.20 Notes.docx

4 Pages
107 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC220H1
Professor
Josh Curtis
Semester
Fall

Description
Age ­ G + G Chapter 20 Age Based Inequalities in Canadian Society Intro Age defines many of our rights/ privileges (voting, drinking, running for public office, armed forces and  serving alcohol as well as drinking) Age shapes aspects of our working lives ex. Clauses allowing employers to pay lower min wages to people  under 18 Both min wage laws and mandatory retirement provisions may seem unfair because 1 or 2 years of  age makes little difference to how effectively most people can perform at work In above cases, age is used as criteria for making decisions about what we can or can’t do. = process called  AGE GRADING and it can seem unfair Determining access to rights privileges based solely on age despite merit and ability runs against  premise of equal opportunity and merit based decision making  Age can be a barrier to rights and privileges not because of laws but through social convention Ex. Workplace seniority takes precedence over performance in determining pay and hours, layoffs,  promotions Ex. Less formal – leaving home, having kids all constrained by age Constraints happen because people have come to believe that these and other behaviors should take  place at certain stages in life course.  Whether resulting from legal regulations or social norms, age based delineations of human behavior are  social creations* aging is a social process Age used to socially construct criteria for classifying people (age grading) a process with implications for  generating and sustaining patterns of inequality  Age, Public Policy, Human Rights Canadian charter of rights and freedoms was designed to ensure all Canadians enjoy equal access to  fundamental opportunities and rewards Age is the only universal attribute (happens to all at same rate) age restrictions apply to all This is an ascribed characteristic  (determined at birth rather than be chosen or achieved liked religion  or education) The extent to other people use ascribed attributes to make judgments about us Example: You are too old to do something, or older age means more maturity good judgment Equal rights for people of all ages is key charter principle Using age to decide the rights and privileges of Canadians is discriminatory  Typically when age grading determines rights and privileges the argument is that these practices place  reasonable limits on people’s activity (Ex. License ­younger people more likely to be irresponsible =more  accidents)  Unequal access is thought to be justified in these circumstances because infringement of individual  rights and privileges is necessary for society Aging of canadian population there will be challenges to age related legislation such as mandatory retirement  (mandatory retirement is now illegal in Quebec, Ontario, and Manitoba)  Age and Dependence Age grading is also related to dependency – the judgments others hold of us or entitlements we get depend  on whether we are believed to be responsible citizens capable of making rational decisions about us and  welfare of others In Canadian justice system policy makers have attempted to grant special rights to young offenders while  also requiring young persons to be accountable for their actions The elderly is defined as dependent The social arrangements of work and family are consequential for relations of dependency or independence Retirement and pension arrangements make it difficult for many Canadians especially women to support  themselves economically later years Dimensions of Economic Inequality over Life Course Dependency is common both in youth and old age Mid life we have most amount of independence (working, independent income) Average incomes increases for men to a peak at age 45 and decline later in life whereas women’s average  incomes are always lower rising only moderate to plateau from ages 35­54 and declining more in senior  years  The nature of 2 curves for men and women reflects the greater continuity of occupational careers for  men and greater variability of women’s attachment to the labor force While wages of young workers are still lower then those older workers the situation has improved in the last  decade (longer hours, higher min wage from 1997­2004) Annual income is a good indicator of cash flow but it says little about an individuals net worth or asset  holdings whereas home ownership is a good measure of that since it is the principle source of wealth for  most Canadians  Living arrangements related to the family home shed light on dependency (home leaving)  Employment trends Educational status Ethnicity Gender  All influence age which young person leaves home permanently. Wome
More Less

Related notes for SOC220H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit