Textbook Notes (378,720)
CA (167,253)
UTSG (10,976)
WDW (80)
WDW101Y1 (63)
Chapter 6

WDW205 Textbook Summary - Chapter 6

3 Pages
195 Views

Department
Woodsworth College Courses
Course Code
WDW101Y1
Professor
William Watson

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Criminology WDW205H1 FOctober 3, 2010 Note Series
6
Chapter 6 Trait Theories
Trait Theories- this approach looks at the combination of biological or psychological attributes that might
explain criminality. Each offender is considered unique, physically and mentally; consequently, there must
be a unique explanation for each persons behaviour
Biological Trait Theory
Somatype- an idea used in a system developed for categorizing people on the basis of their body build,
associated with the work of William Sheldon
Sociobiology- branch of science that views human behaviour as being motivated by inborn biological urges
and desires. The urge to survive and reproduce motivates human behaviour
Equipotentiality- view that all individuals are equal at birth and are thereafter influenced by their
environment
Instincts- the mechanism by which routine actions and behaviour are known automatically without
learning
Biological Theories of Crime
Biochemical
-major premise is that crime is a function of diet, vitamins, hormonal imbalances or food allergies
Neurological
-major premise is that delinquents often suffer brain impairment; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
(ADHD) and minimal brain dysfunction are related to antisocial behaviour
Genetic
-major premise is that criminal traits and predispositions are inherited; the criminality of parents can
predict the delinquency of children
Evolutionary
-major premise is that as the human race evolved, traits become ingrained; some of these traits make
people aggressive and predisposed to commit crime
Biochemical Conditions and Crime
Hypoglycemia- a biochemical condition, in this case a deficiency of sugar, influences antisocial behaviour
and criminality
Androgens- male sex hormones, linked to criminality
Testosterone- an androgen, or male hormone, which controls secondary sex characteristics and can alter
behaviour
Premenstrual Syndrome PMS- the biogenetic theory that several days prior to and during menstruation
females are beset by irrationability and poor judgement as a result of hormonal changes, and that this
puts them at a greater risk for criminality
Neurophysiology- the study of brain activity that looks at neurological and physical abnormalities
acquired during the fetal or perinatal stage thought to control behaviour
Electroencephalograph EEG- a device that can record the electronic impulses given off by the brain,
commonly called brain waves
Minimal Brain Dysfunction MBD- an abnormality in cerebral structure causes maladaptive behaviour;
linked to serious antisocial acts, an imbalance in the urge-control mechanisms of the brain, and chemical
abnormality
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ADHD- a condition in which a child shows a developmentally
inappropriate lack of attention, impulsivity and hyperactivity
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Criminology WDW205H1 F October 3, 2010 Note Series 6 Chapter 6 Trait Theories Trait Theories- this approach looks at the combination of biological or psychological attributes that might explain criminality. Each offender is considered unique, physically and mentally; consequently, there must be a unique explanation for each persons behaviour Biological Trait Theory Somatype- an idea used in a system developed for categorizing people on the basis of their body build, associated with the work of William Sheldon Sociobiology- branch of science that views human behaviour as being motivated by inborn biological urges and desires. The urge to survive and reproduce motivates human behaviour Equipotentiality- view that all individuals are equal at birth and are thereafter influenced by their environment Instincts- the mechanism by which routine actions and behaviour are known automatically without learning Biological Theories of Crime Biochemical -major premise is that crime is a function of diet, vitamins, hormonal imbalances or food allergies Neurological -major premise is that delinquents often suffer brain impairment; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and minimal brain dysfunction are related to antisocial behaviour Genetic -major premise is that criminal traits and predispositions are inherited; the criminality of parents can predict the delinquency of
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit