Textbook Notes (368,311)
Canada (161,806)
Economics (708)
Chapter 12

Economics 1021A Chapter 12

3 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
Economics 1021A/B
Professor
Terry Biggs
Semester
Fall

Description
Economics 1021A Chapter 13 2013­11­25 A monopoly is a market:  That produces a good or service for which no  close substitute exists In which there isone  supplier that is protected from competition by a barrier preventing the entry of new  firms.  A monopoly is a price setter, not a price taker like a firm in perfect competition. The reason is that the demand for the monopoly’s output is the market demand.  To sell a larger output, a monopoly must set a lower price. A monopoly has two key features: No close substitutes If a good has a close substitute, even if it is produced by only one firm, that firm effectively faces  competition from the producers of the substitute. A monopoly sells a good that has no close substitutes.  Barriers to entry A constraint that protects a firm from potential competitors are called a barrier to entry. Three types of  barriers to entry are: Natural A natural monopoly is a market in which economies of scale enable one firm to supply the entire  market at the lowest possible cost. In a natural monopoly, economies of scale are so powerful that they are still being achieved even when the  entire market demand is met. Ownership An ownership barrier to entry occurs if one firm owns a significant portion of a key resource. Legal A legal monopoly is a market in which competition and entry are restricted by the granting of a: Public franchise (like Canada Post, a public  franchise to deliver first­class mail) Government license (like a license to practice law or medicine) Patent or copyright There are two types of monopoly price­setting strategies: A single­price monopoly is a firm that must sell each unit of its output for the same price to all its  customers. For a single­price monopoly, marginal revenue is less than price at each level of output. A single­price monopoly’s marginal revenue is related to the elasticity of demand for its good: If demand is elastic, a fall in price brings an increase in total revenue. The monopoly selects the profit­maximizing quantity in the same manner as a competitive firm, wheMR    = MC . The monopoly might make an economic profit, even in the long run, because the barriers to entry protect  the firm from market entry by competitor firms. A single­price monopoly never  produces an output at which demand is inelastic. If it did produce such an output, the firm could increase total revenue, decrease total cost, and increase  economic profit by decreasing output. Compared to perfect competition, monopoly produces a smaller output and charges a higher price. Because price exceeds marginal social cost, marginal social benefit exceeds marginal social c st, and a  deadweight loss arises. Some of the lost consumer surplus goes to the monopoly as producer surplus. Price discrimination is the practice of selling different units of a good or service for different prices.  Many firms price discriminate, but not all of them are monopoly firms. To be able to price discriminate, a monopoly must: Identify and separate different buyer types. Sell a product that cannot be resold. Price differences that arise from cost differences are not price discriminat
More Less

Related notes for Economics 1021A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit