Textbook Notes (359,019)
Canada (156,000)
Psychology (1,855)
PS262 (61)
Chapter 8

Chapter 8 Motion.docx

6 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

School
Wilfrid Laurier University
Department
Psychology
Course
PS262
Professor
Elizabeth Olds
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 8: Perceiving Motion Functions of Motion Perception Motion Helps Us Understand Events in Our Environment ­ One source of information about where we are going and how fast we move is the  way objects in the environment flow past us as we move ­ Optic flow is when a person moves forward objects move relative to the person in  the opposite direction; this provides information about the walker’s direction and  speed ­ Akinetopsia ­ blindness to motion; woman had a stroke and couldn’t perceive  motion, didn’t know when to stop pouring tea, couldn’t follow conversations  because she couldn’t see facial movement Motion Attracts Attention ­ Attentional capture is the ability of motion to attract attention ­ Freezing in place eliminates the attention attracting effects  Motion Provides Information About Objects ­ The stationary bird is difficult to see when it is covered by the pattern because the  bird and the pattern are made up of similar lines ­ Once the bird starts moving it is easier to identify  ­ Our own motion relative to objects is constantly adding to the information we  have about the objects and we receive similar information when objects move  relative to us Studying Motion Perception When Do We Perceive Motion? ­ Real motion is the actual motion of an object ­ We perceive motion when something moves across our field of view ­ Illusionary motion is perception of motion when there actually is none ­ Apparent motion is an illusion of movement that occurs when two objects  separated in space are presented rapidly one after another separated by a brief  time interval ­ Induced motion occurs when motion of one object (usually large) causes a  nearby stationary object (usually smaller) to appear to move Ex. Clouds (large)  moving across the moon (small) makes it look like the moon is moving when it is  stationary  ­ Motion aftereffects occur when viewing a moving stimulus 30­60sec causes a  stationary stimulus to appear to move ­ Waterfall illusion is an example of motion aftereffects because if you look at a  waterfall for 30­60seconds and then look off to the side at part of a scene that is  stationary, you will see everything in the scene, such as rocks and trees, appear to  be moving for a few seconds Comparing Real and Apparent Motion ­ There is evidence that apparent motion and real motion have a lot in common ­ Larsen created an experiment to show using fMRI scans that during each motion,  the same part of the brain was being used ­ Because of the similarities, both motions are studied together as one What We Want to Explain ­ The goal is to understand how we perceive things that are moving ­ As Jeremy walks past Maria, her eyes are stationary; His image sweeps across her  retina ­ As Jeremy walks past Maria, she follows him with her eyes; His image is  stationary on her fovea ­ As Maria scans the room by moving her eyes; The images of the room move left  across her retina but no perception of the objects of the room moving Motion Perception: Information in the Environment ­ Optic array is the structure created y the surfaces, textures, and contours of the  environment  ­ How movement of the observer causes changes in the optic array ­ When Jeremy walks across Maria’s field of view, portions of the optic array  become covered as he walks by and then are uncovered as he moves on. This is  called a local disturbance in the optic array ­ Local disturbance in the optic array occurs when Jeremy moves relative to the  environment, covering and uncovering the stationary background ­ When Maria follows Jeremy with her eyes, the same local disturbance  information that was available when Maria was keeping her eyes still remains  available when she is moving her eyes, which indicates that Jeremy is moving ­ When Maria scanned the room with her eyes, the fact that everything moved at  once in response to movement of the observers eyes or body is called global optic  flow; this signals that the environment is stationary ­ According to Gibson, motion is perceived when one part of the visual scene  moves relative to the rest of the scene and no motion is perceived when the entire  field moves or remains stationary Motion Perception: Retina/Eye Information  ­ Consider neural signals that travel from eye to brain for moving person The Reichardt Detector  ­ The Reichardt Detector results in neurons that fire to movement in one direction ­ Excitation and inhibition are arranged so that movement in one direction creates  inhibition that eliminates neural responding, whereas movement in the opposite  direction creates excitation that enhances neural responding ­ When moving from left to right, receptor A is stimulated which excites receptor E,  then receptor E inhibits receptor F. The light has moved to receptor B causing an  excitatory response to F, but F is already inhibited by E so it does not fire,  therefore when moving from left to right, neuron I does not respond ­ When moving from right to left, receptor D sends a signal to H causing it to fire  and excite neuron I. Recptor C activates neuron G which sends inhibition back to  H, however this is too late since H is already excited so G becomes inhibited  ­ Thus, the inhibition arrives too late to stop the signal from getting to neuron I  ­ Therefore, neuron I only fires to movement to the left, but not to the right Corollary Discharge Theory ­ Corollary discharge theory takes into account eye movement; explains motion  perception as being determined by movement of the image on the retina and by  signals that indicate movement of the eyes Signals From the Retina and the Eye Muscles ­ An image displacement signal (IDS) occurs when an image moves across  receptors in the retina, as when Jeremy walks across Maria’s field of view while  she stares straight ahead ­ A motor signal (MS) occurs when a signal is sent from the brain to the eye  muscles. This signal occurs when Maria moves her eyes to follow Jeremy as he  walks across the room ­ A corollary discharge signal (CDS) is a copy of the motor signal that, instead of  going to the eye muscles, is sent to a different place in the brain. This is analogous  to using the “cc” function when sending an email. The email goes to the person it  is addressed to and is simultaneously sent to someone else at another address.  When Maria follows Jeremy with her eyes ­ The comparator receives both IDS and CDS. If just one type of signal reaches  the comparator it relays a message to the brain that movement occurred and  motion is perceived. But if both reach the comparator at the same time, the cancel  out each other, so no signal is sent to the area of the brain responsible for motion  perception ­ The CDT proposes that the visual system takes into account both information  about stimulation of the receptors and information about movement of the eyes Behavioural Evidence for Corollary Discharge Theory  ­ Why does the afterimage appear to move when you move your eyes? The circles  image on the retina has created a circular area of bleached visual pigment which  remains in the same place no matter where the eye is looking ­ The motor signals sent to move your eyes are creating a corollary discharge signal  which reaches the comparator alone so the afterimage appears to move ­ Why do you see motion when you push your eyelid? In an experiment  participants were asked to do this and stare at a specific spot but the push didn’t  cause their eye to move because the eye muscle
More Less

Related notes for PS262

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit