Textbook Notes (367,754)
Canada (161,370)
Psychology (1,949)
PS285 (38)
Chapter 16

Health Psychology – Chapter 16 notes .docx

5 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS285
Professor
Eric Theriault
Semester
Winter

Description
Health Psychology – Chapter 16: End­Of­Life Issues ­ death in modern society occurs overwhelmingly in hospitals, although this portion  is decreasing  ­ if you are in a long­term care facility when the end comes, you are likely to die  there. If you are living in the community when the end comes, you are likely to be  taken to a hospital and die there.  ­ Hospitalization at the end of life can result in a prolongation of dying, rather than  a good death  ­ Death due to suicide increases near the end of life, but reasons for this are not  well understood.  ­ Suicide in old age tends to happen among those who have severe health problems;  most have not attempted suicide before; and, unlike suicide among younger  people, it is equally likely for the married and the single.  ­ Kubler­Ross developed her theory of five stages inherent within the process of  dying: denial, then anger, then bargaining, then depression and finally acceptance.  Varies from person to person.  ­ It is important to recognize that dying involves more than biological changes;  there is meaning in life even when death is impending.  ­ Older people, by virtue of their proximity to death, are assumed to accept death; it  is assumed that they do not find it frightening and need not even discuss death.  ­ It was found by Clarke and Hanson that older individuals in the UK do want to  talk about death, although they are not obsessed by or overly preoccupied with it.  It is a myth that just because one is aged, one is necessarily completely prepared  for death.  ­ Because of the prolongation of the dying process due to chronic illness in old age,  there has been increased interested in SPIRITUALITY and the meaning of life  toward the end.  ­ Dying individuals can have CRISES OF MEANING also referred to as soul pain,  where they experience a lack of meaning, coherence, or comfort with their life.  ­ Quality­Adjusted Life Years refer to the duration of life in various compromised  health conditions. All score one full year of healthy life at 1.0. the standard  “gamble technique” asks a respondent to make a hypothetical choice between  continued life in their present state or a gamble that would result in either perfect  health or death.  o Time trade­off refers to asking individuals how much time they would be  willing to give up in order to be in… ­ Lawton argues that years of desired life is not determined entirely by quality of  life but is mediated by intervening cognitive affective schema referred to as  valuation of life. VOL is defined as the extent to which the person is attached to  his or her present life due to enjoyment and the absence of distress, as well as  hope, futurity, purpose, meaningfulness, persistence and self­efficacy. Lawton and  his associates find that people choose fewer years of life if life is marred by  functional and cognitive impairment or pain.  ­ VOL is an attitude that motivates people for continuing to live longer and that its  incorporation of purpose may be critical as a sustaining force in the desire to live.  ­ Fear of death  ▯fear of the unknown or to fear of the process of dying.  ­ Canadians identified five domains of quality end­of­life care:  o Receiving adequate pain and symptom management o Avoiding inappropriate prolongation of dying o Achieving a sense of control o Relieving burden o Strengthening relationships with loved ones  ­ TRAJECTORY  ▯refers to a particular path and can include a change in the  pattern of health status. In end­of­life trajectories, you can think of one trajectory  as sudden death from an unexpected cause, such as an accident or heart attack. All  of these trajectories define living near death in terms of health status.  ­ It appears that depression increases with nearness to death and that suicide rates  are higher among terminally ill adults than among healthy adults  ­ At the end of life, seniors want candid but sensitive communication; they also  want respect and recognition and a multidisciplinary approach that docues on  medical needs as well as on psychological, spiritual and emotional needs.  ­ COMFORT: a state of ease and contentment; relief from discomfort; and  transcendence, or being strengthened and invigorated. Only the individual knows  when they are comfortable.  ­ Leading causes of death are now from chronic progressive organ system failure –  heart disease, cancer, stroke.  ­ Areas that are believed are relavent for quality of care: spirituality and personal  growth while dying; a natural death in familiar surroundings with loved ones;  symptom management; sensitive communication to allow decision making and  planing’ family and patient treated as a unit; absence of financial, emotional and  physical burden for family members  ­ Research on health­care providers most notably physicians, do not provide care  consistent with the wishes of the patient.  ­ Medical care tends to focus on survival even survival at all costs.  ­ Physicians’ communication with patients is therefore of particular importance  near the end of life. Most adults want realistic estimates of how long they can  expect to live.  ­ There has been a lack of communication, because of the difficulty of definitive  diagnoses and prognoses and because of a desire to maintain the hopes of the  patient.  ­ In quebec, the term palliative care was used, rather than hospice, and is a unique  Canadian use of the term. American usage differentiates between the terms  hospice and palliative care, with hospice representing a formal set of practices and  closely linked to federal requirements for medicare funding and PALLIATIVE  care a more general descriptive term. Canadian usage does not distinguish in this  way ­ In 2001, the B.C. government announced the establishment of the Palliative Care  Benefits Program to remove financial barriers for terminally ill persons who wish  to receive care at home.  ­ The vast majority of those enrolled are cancer patients, to be eligible, individuals  must be in the terminal stages of a life­threatening disease or illness with a life  expectancy of up to 6 months.  ­ The compassionate care benefit allows Canadians to receive employment  insurance if they temporarily leave their jobs to care for a dying family member  ­ The focus in palliative care is on MAXIMUM COMFORT and not simply  maximum survival.  ­ Comfort care is often consistent with limitations on aggressive medical  interventions. It can include transfer to acutve­care hospitals or units of hospitals  and tube feeding if normal eating is not possible.  ­ Effective grieving requires the treatment and prevention of coping problems  related to death; coaching patient and family through grieving; assessing and  respon
More Less

Related notes for PS285

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit