Textbook Notes (368,314)
Canada (161,808)
York University (12,845)
Psychology (3,584)
PSYC 3140 (267)
Chapter 3

Health Psychology Chapter 3 notes.docx

10 Pages
71 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3140
Professor
Joel Goldberg
Semester
Winter

Description
Health Psychology Chapter 3 notes Health Behaviors What is health promotion • health and wellness are both a personal and collective achievement • enabling people to increase control over and improve their health • Lalonde report 1974 suggested a health promoting approach to keep Canadians healthy Why are health behaviors important? • acute disorders have declined thanks to innovations in health standards • smoking, poor diet, physical inactivity are the leading social and behavioral factors • practicing good health behaviors will expand the number of years a person can enjoy free of  chronic disease • leading causes of death in Canada: heart disease, cancer, stroke, accidental injury What are health behaviors? • behaviors like health habits undertaken by people to enhance or maintain their health • good health habits: ­sleeping 8 hours a night ­not smoking ­eating breakfast ­avoid alcohol ­regular exercise • primary prevention: taking measures to combat risk factors before an illness has a chance  to develop • example of this are weight­loss programs, which are behavior­change methods designed to  help peopple alter their problematic health behavior • another tactic is to stop people from developing unhealthy behavior in the first place What factors influence the practice of health behaviors? • SES: younger, more affluent people with better education, low stress and high social support  practice better health habits • Age: health habits are good in children and deteriorate as we age • Gender: girls eat more healthier food and are less involved in sports • Values: cultural differences in how exercise is viewed • Personal control: the health locus of control scale measures the degree to which people  perceive health to be under their control, those who perceive it as such are more likely to try and  improve it than those who don't perceive it as such • Social influence: e.g. peer pressure, media influence • Personal goals • Perceived symptoms: cutting back on bad health habit because of perceived symptom • Place: living in a rural vs urban area. Rural areas have lower healthy habits • Cognitive factors: believing that certain health behaviors are beneficial Barriers to Modifying Poor Health Behaviors • once bad habits are ingrained, people are not motivated to change them • unhealthy behaviors can be pleasurable, automatic, addictive and resistant to change • instability of health behaviors: over time, health behaviors become unstable for a few  reasons: ­health habits are controlled by different factors ­different factors may control the same health behavior for different people ­old motivations to take up a health behavior may change over time Intervening with children and adolescents (those who may be helped the most, thus why health habit  interventions are usually focused on them) • socialization: health habits are strongly affected by early socialization, parental role models • teachable moments: there are better times for teaching health habits than others, crucial point at  which a person is ready to modify a behavior • window of vulnerability: childhood and junior high school are sensitive periods for children to pick  up smoking and drinking • adolescent behavior can predict what illnesses a person will suffer from in adulthood (after 45) Interventions with at risk people • benefits of working with people who are at risk for health disorders ­early identification can help develop healthy habits and eliminate poor health habits that might  increase vulnerability • problems of focusing on risk ­people are unrealistically optimistic about their vulnerability to health risks ­people at risk might get too stressed and in turn the stress might exacerbate their risk • ethical issues: ­creating unnecessary distress may not justify risk­reducing behavior ­some people predisposed to depression might react badly to genetic results for health disorders • health promotion and the elderly ­WHO defined active aging as "the process of optimizing opportunities for health, participation and  security in order to enhance the quality of life as people age" Ethnic and Gender Differences in Health Risks and Habits • alcohol consumption is a greater problem with men than women • smoking is a greater problem with minorities than non­minorities • native Canadian's diabetes is 3 times the national average What theories and models are used for understanding health behavior change? • changing poor health habits in people who are not at risk • first, attitudinal approaches: giving people the correct information about the implications of their  poor health habits will motivate them to change ­attitude change campaigns may induce the desire but are not successful at teaching people  exactly how to change those attitudes • cognition models: the role of attitudes and beliefs in changing health behavior • stage based approach Attitude change and health behavior: • educational appeals:  ­communication should be colorful and vivid, no statistics and jargon ­communicator should be expert, prestigious and similar to the audience ­arguments should be presented at the beginning and the end ­message should be short and direct ­extreme messages are discounted e.g. encouraging people to exercise several hours a day ­illness detecting behavior should be emphasized on communicating the problems if not  undertaken. For health promotion, emphasizing benefits is more effective ­if audience is receptive to changing health habits=discuss only favorable points. If the audience is  not receptive to the message= discuss both sides • fear appeals: assumption is that if a person is fearful of a habit's consequence on their health that  they will do things to reduce their fear. Studies show fear is not efficient for reducing people's bad  health habits • message framing: messages phrased either in positive or negative terms ­prospect theory: loss­framed messages emphasize potential problems and they work better for  high risk outcomes, and gain­framed messages that stress benefits are more persuasive with low  risk behavior ­e.g. high risk associated with not using condoms=loss­framed, more convincing. Message that  focused on disease prevention (low risk)= gain­framed were more effective Social Cognition Models of Health Behavior Change • social cognition models: beliefs that people hold about certain health behavior motivate  their desire to change that behavior • expectancy­value theory: people will choose to engage in behaviors that they expect to  succeed in which have outcomes that they value • health belief model: a person's practice of health behavior depends on two factors: whether  the person perceives a personal health threat and whether that person believes that a  particular health practice will be effective in reducing that threat • perception of health threat:  ­general health values: interest and concern about health ­specific beliefs about personal vulnerability to a disorder ­belief about consequences of the disorder (is it serious or not) • perceived threat reduction: (depends on two individual beliefs) ­whether the health practice will be effective or not ­and the cost of the measure does not exceed the benefits of the measure • Support for the health belief model: it explains people's practice of health habits quite well • changing behavior using the health belief model
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 3140

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit