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Class Notes for Linguistics at Carleton University


CARLETONLING 2604Jacquie BallantineFall

LING 2604 Lecture Notes - Lecture 7: Heritability, Music Therapy, Sensory Integration Therapy

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Heller 1900: noted normal development for a few yrs & then regressed. Bleuler 1911 (coined the term autism ) Kanner 1943: clinical description (social
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CARLETONLING 1100Lev BlumenfeldWinter

LING 1100 Lecture Notes - Lecture 12: Dental And Alveolar Flaps, Great Vowel Shift, Vocal Folds

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CARLETONLING 2604Jacquie BallantineFall

LING 2604 Lecture Notes - Lecture 11: 2015 American League Division Series, Cluttering, Speech Production

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Alds 2604 fluency disorders in children and adults. Incidence = about 5% of children will experience period of stuttering lasting up to 6 months. More
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CARLETONLING 1100Lev BlumenfeldWinter

LING 1100 Lecture Notes - Lecture 4: Animal Communication, Animal Language, Vocal Tract

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Modalities: sound, sound inaudible to humans, visual (posture, facial expressions, colour, touch, chemical communication, electrical signals. Why apes
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CARLETONLING 1100Lev BlumenfeldWinter

LING 1100 Lecture Notes - Lecture 2: Arbitrariness, Onomatopoeia

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CARLETONLING 1100Peter BuistWinter

LING 1100 Lecture Notes - Lecture 1: Animal Communication, Phonetics, Language Change

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This is not a class on how to write or speak correctly. This is not a class on how to learn a foreign language. A breezy intro to core topics in lingui
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CARLETONLING 3505Ida ToivonenWinter

LING 3505 Lecture Notes - Lecture 1: Denotation, Pragmatics, Intension

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Semantics will be the study of literal meaning in this class (everything else is pragmatics) Literal meaning, actual meaning, what people use to interp
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CARLETONLING 1001Bethany Mac LeodFall

LING 1001 Lecture Notes - Lecture 1: Linguistic Performance, Grammaticality, Canadian English

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09/03/2015 (cid:1) (cid:1) (cid:1) (cid:1) (cid:1) (cid:1) (cid:1) Native speakers: can produce unlimited amount of utterances, native speakers knowled
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CARLETONLING 1100Lev BlumenfeldWinter

LING 1100 Lecture Notes - Lecture 6: Sith, Sound Change, Norther

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In class example: windsor vs. detroit fronting of [a] i(cid:374) (cid:858)pot(cid:859) a(cid:374)d (cid:858)drops(cid:859) for example (detroit) raisin
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CARLETONLING 1001Bethany Mac LeodFall

LING 1001 Lecture Notes - Lecture 24: Phonetics, Pragmatics, Sociolinguistics

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Studying for the final make a plan: Think about each of the sections we"ve covered (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, su
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CARLETONLING 2604Jacquie BallantineFall

LING 2604 Lecture Notes - Lecture 12: Conductive Hearing Loss, Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Otitis Media

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Adults: 10% of canadians report having a hearing loss; 20% over the age of 65 & 40% over age 75, most losses in adults are sensorineural but conductive
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CARLETONLING 2604Jacquie BallantineFall

LING 2604 Lecture Notes - Lecture 9: Hemiparesis, Bulbar Palsy, Arcuate Fasciculus

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Aphasia = language disorder which occurs some time after individual has completely developed competent language skills. Results from neurological damag
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