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Lecture 13

BCHM 316 Lecture Notes - Lecture 13: Cholesteryl Ester, Ester, Coenzyme A


Department
Biochemistry
Course Code
BCHM 316
Professor
Glenville Jones
Lecture
13

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Cellular Lipid Transport and Carnitine
As a FA enters a mitochondria, it is broken down. ( It doesn’t leave).
FAs on albumin and glycerol are exported to liver and/or muscle.
- Lipases are slow
FAs are weak acids, ionized at cellular pH (~7). However, 95% is bound in
blood/cell. (So free carboxyl group is tied up).
Covalently or noncovalently bound.
IN THE BLOOD:
Albumin bound FAs ←→ free FA ←→ TG & CE in lipoprotein
*Fatty acid transporter*
IN THE CELL:
FA ←→ FA binding protein
FA combines with CoA via thiokinase
Fatty acyl-CoA →
- Storage (adipocyte)
- B-oxidation in mitochondria (myocyte)
- Membrane phospholipids (all cells)
We want to convert our FA into an esterified form, so that it will be inactive.
Glycerol + 3 HOOC -R2 → TG
Cholesterol + HOOC- R2 → cholesteryl ester
Co-ASH + HOOC-R2 → coenzyme a -s-c (=o)-r2 or fatty acyl coA
TG & cholesteryl esters: covalently-bound FAs
Co-enzyme A (thiokinase)
- B-mercaptoethylamine, then long pantothenic acid chain
CoA-SH + fatty acid + ATP AMP + iPP ( 2 phosphate bonds cleaved) + fatty acyl-CoA
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