GEO 793 Lecture Notes - United States House Committee On Oversight And Government Reform, Megacity

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Suburban Citizenship? The rise of targeting and the eclipse of social rights in
Toronto
- The amalgamation (collaboration) collapsed a two-tier system of local government
into one “megacity”, forming a new jurisdiction out of the old city of Toronto and
the surrounding mature suburbs
- Amalgamation created confusion for city staff and politicians, who were charged
with the task of harmonizing their policies, practices, priorities and employees, in the
face of massive budget cutbacks
- Understood as a social right, recreation was subsidized and in effect, “free” to
residents
- The institution of “targeting” across the new city marked the final dismantling of
social citizenship approaches to public recreation that developed in Toronto in the
post-war era
- The decline of “universal” welfare forms of social citizenship and state forms, or
advanced liberal technologies of government
- The eclipse of welfare forms of social citizenship and the rise of selective or targeted
social policy through a case study of public recreation in Toronto
- Scholars have highlighted how governments are adopting targeting practices to
achieve cost-savings, but they have also shown how this form of provision constructs
particular groups of people as static and inherently problematic
- These amalgamations were intended to provide public cost-savings through the
elimination of duplication and through downsizing the local civil service and
councils, but also provided an occasion for the province to reorganize both provincial
and municipal responsibilities
- “Community Action Policy” criminalizes low-income, immigrant, racialized and
queer areas of the City
- Important links between the social and spatial selectivity part and parcel to targeting,
but there has been far less attention devoted to spatiality as it relates to the genesis of
these practices and rationalities
- The rapid suburban growth required the expansion of municipal infrastructure and
triggered some investment in social services, which has previously been provided on
a volunteers basis
- Recreation services were considered “something people wanted, something they had
a right to have”
- The role of suburban recreation departments was limited to supporting the efforts of
existing groups that were interested in acquiring recreational facilities for their own
neighbourhoods
- Reaction departments defined themselves as services that groups could chose to
come forward and access, but without positive responsibilities independent of such
external initiatives
- In contrast to the downtown, the suburban municipalities also assumed that
recreation needs should be met at least partially, if not primarily, by the private
sector
- Public recreation was charged with supporting the needs of the private sector through
investment in facilities that were then leased to sport clubs and other social groups
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Document Summary

The rise of targeting and the eclipse of social rights in. The amalgamation (collaboration) collapsed a two-tier system of local government into one megacity , forming a new jurisdiction out of the old city of toronto and the surrounding mature suburbs. Amalgamation created confusion for city staff and politicians, who were charged with the task of harmonizing their policies, practices, priorities and employees, in the face of massive budget cutbacks. Understood as a social right, recreation was subsidized and in effect, free to residents. The institution of targeting across the new city marked the final dismantling of social citizenship approaches to public recreation that developed in toronto in the post-war era. The decline of universal welfare forms of social citizenship and state forms, or advanced liberal technologies of government. The eclipse of welfare forms of social citizenship and the rise of selective or targeted social policy through a case study of public recreation in toronto.

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