Class Notes (834,408)
Canada (508,508)
Marketing (91)
MARK301 (48)
Lecture

Mark 301 - First month of notes.docx

8 Pages
124 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Marketing
Course
MARK301
Professor
Jennifer Argo
Semester
Winter

Description
Company – January 11, 14 Disney ­in the 90s loss of net income, expanded wrong way? ­having the Disney label gives entertainment, products, movies, cruises, experiences (Disneyland) ­Four branches (SBUs)– media networks, parks and resorts, studio entertainment, consumer products ­Spent billions to diversify their company to dominate many types of consumers Strategic Planning – process of developing and maintaining a fit between 1. org. goals and capabilities,  2. changing market opportunities ­­Long term Steps 1. Define Mission statement – framework of how to think of things, stmt of org.’s purpose, market  oriented, defined in terms of customer needs, should be: realistic, specific, fit the enviro., motivating,  based on distinctive competencies (what makes them diff. from other companies), should not be  product­oriented (don’t want to be too specific, not motivated with emotion, doesn’t separate from  other companies) should be market­oriented (emotion), more for the business than the consumer 2. Derive company goals and objectives – goals related to mission, objectives related to goals ex: to  protect existing brands and acquire new brands, maximize earnings by expanding for ex. 3. design business portfolio – products and business to achieve missions, “what should we offer”, how  to organize our offerings into strategic business units SBUs – to cluster, do these fulfill our mission and  goals 4. design marketing strategy (4 P’s) (not as high level as 1­3 that occur at corporate level, may happen  at specific product/brand/strategic business unit SBU), marketing unit doesn’t function independently,  partners with design, suppliers, customers…, goal to get value for customer Marketing myopia – focusing too narrowly on product, left behind by your competition ex: railroads now not a dominant form of transportation Analyzing portfolios: ­BCG Matrix (where you are) ­Product­Market Expansion Grid (future) ­the business portfolio is the collection of business and products that make up the company ­the company must – analyze current SBUs, develop future strategies for growth/downsizing ­Boston Consulting Group Growth­Share Matrix – not strategy oriented, which SBUs need help? ­­relative market share – SBUs sales relative to the largest in your industry, want to be on left ­­market growth rate – how quickly market is moving ­­Cash cow – where you want to be, you dominate area of industry, low growth so consistent, don’t  have to put in a lot of money, always bring in cash, low competition ­­Star – very expensive because always fighting competition, money from cash cow usually goes into  stars ­­Question marks – new entrants to marketplace, little market share because low sales, high  competition so costing a lot of money, want to move towards star until market slows down then drop to  cash cow ­­Dog – should either drop it because it’s not a growing area and you don’t have a lot of market share,  cost money to keep around, either put a lot of money into it and move it to a question mark (unlikely  because little growth) or move to cash cow but hard because you have a lot of market to capture BCG ex: Kodak ­approx. 4 SBUs, circles are diff. SBUs 1. film dying, 2. cameras, 3 and 4 were questions because  weren’t common items, but a lot of growth, could go to many places (want to go to cash cow ideally) BCG problems – snapshot (focus on current bus. not future planning), time consuming and costly, diff.  to define SBUs and measure market share and growth, can place too much emphasis on growth, can  lead to poorly planned diversification (want cash cows, but imp. to implement new question marks to  keep growing) Product­market expansion grid – how can we grow?, future oriented ­­Markets on one side, products on top, either existing or new ex: Tim Horton’s – how to grow in such a caffeinated marketplace? –hard to expand as a coffee  company, have to think creatively ­­Market Penetration – keep existing products and current customers, entice them to buy more (roll up  the rim, quickpay card, drive thru, tims in gas stations) ­­Market Development – go to new markets (go to US, cobrand with Coldstone) ­­Product Development – same customers with new products (paninis, instant coffee, fancier drinks,  coffee maker) ­­Diversificiation – new products and new markets, stretching company name (hockey or soccer teams) ex: Disney – what growth strategy do they use? ­­Market Penetration – change of pricing, taking movies out of the vault, vcr to dvd to blueray ­­Product Development – new movies, new characters ­­Market Development – going international ex. eurodisney ­­Diversification – when started cruise lines ­­Disney major growth strategy is diversification  ▯is this a good strategy, very effective, long term  projectory, hurt them when they spend the money at first Presentations ­ January 14 Choose concepts to cover from within each topic – pick company  Emailed by 10pm night before (FIRSTNAME_LASTNAME.ppt) Company intro, what pricing/distribution/branding strategy do they use, why are they using this  strategy, is this an effective strategy, what other strategies could they use topic and company will det. which questions you focus more on Topic: Macro Feb 4 Ethics and Social Marketing– January 14 ­think critically about firm behaviours, understand social criticism of marketing, understand  consequences of criticisms ­Social Marketing – vs corporate social responsibility ­when is it wrong to be marketing? what should and shouldn’t be marketed? appropriate places to be  marketing? ­Coke – WWII, wanted to be available to soldiers, to both Allies and Axis ­WWII other companies were involved – Hugo Boss made clothes by prisonrs of war to clothe the SS,  Volkswagen designed Beetle with Hitler, IBM to get info about prisoners – code about you and  execution and what camp, Ford and GM gave money, Jews put money in Swiss banks and couldn’t get  money back, Siemens supplied to Nazis – wanted to patent Zicon (by Bayer – gas canisters) to use on  gas ovens  ▯have to be forward looking (may not know consequences of their actions)  ▯class action lawsuits in the 90s  ­Benetton – wanted social issues in their marketing (priest and nun, Aids to be perceived in more  human way, environmental issues, blood coloured clothing in Yugoslavia war of Bosnian war, hearts to  counter racism ­fine line between ethical and unethical – ex Nokia, ad shows them using camera, can see reflection of  camera crew wasn’t actually phone doing the recording ­Product marketing – skin lightener creams in India, scotchguard made of hazardous materials,  Facebook privacy, Kleenex disposing into the enviro.   January 16 Legal/Ethical issues in marketing: ­legal is a fine line, ethical vs unethical harder to define ­Ethical depends on three things: societal culture and norms, business culture and industry practices,  corporate culture and expectations ▯ hape what behaviours are ethical and what you see as moral ▯ an be different in other cultures ex: bribes are common in other places Criticisms of marketing: ­immoral and hazardous to consumer welfare – Critical ­various complaints ­High Prices – argued that they are unreasonable (ex: gas), argued back that they want to give you  products that have value, when you consistently tell consumers your price they expect it to stay low ­Deceptive Practices – telling consumers suggested retail much higher than it is, false advertising ­Materialism – concerning ourselves with wealth more than we need to?, gives people good feeling and  feeling of status, is arguable, maybe status spoils but is nice to receive once in a while ▯ reating false needs – it is difficult for companies to create new needs, maybe can change wants, can  make a need more salient  ▯ e Beers campaign to increase sales of diamonds – focused on males buying engagement rings, bigger   diamond shows you are that dedicated ­Shoddy/Unsafe products – recalls, can make stock price drop ­Cultural Pollution – nonstop marketing messages everyday all day (3000/day as a Canadian) ­Advertising Stereotypes – mostly on women, sexualizing women and skinny models advertising  products, new law that BMI of models has to be 18.5 or there has to be a disclaimer, about a decade  ago body postures of model in ads signals things ­ male in more dominant position and females in more  submissive positions ­False Advertising – ex: smoking is not unhealthy ­Consequences – consumers are what we care about, everyone has rights ­Companies should: be corporately responsible ­Social marketing – for social good (goals different than corporate social responsibility, and comes  from governments and non­profits) not the company, ex: PSAs, try to use humour and make things fun  to change behaviour, others can be more serious and scary (ex: TAC ­ emotional, enforcement,  educational) ▯ o change attitudes/behaviour, target certain people Microenvironment ­Marketing environment – micro and macro, the actors and forces outside marketing that affect  marketing management’s ability to build and maintain successful relationships with target customers ­Micro – a system of actors in the environment, takes many people to successfully market ­company’s internal environment ▯ nside a company (SBUs, departments) ▯ ffects marketing’s planning strategies (work with all parts of company, adhere to mission statement) ▯ uppliers provide resources (are like partners) ▯ ntermediaries (important for Place, the ‘middle men’, four broad categories: resellers, physical  distribution firms, marketing services agencies, financial intermediaries, ALL companies need the four  functions of these intermediaries even if they don’t have them, business may do it themselves), needs to  be done internally or externally ▯ ustomers – consumers for personal use, business buyers who move the product to consumers,  government buyers for the public ex: apartments ▯ ompetition – have to identify them, companies often identify competition incorrectly at wrong level:  similar products and services at similar prices (ex: haagen daaz), same product class (cheaper ice cream  they may not think of), same need/want satisfied (frozen novelties), same dollars competed for (any  snacks), competition satisfies the same want as yours, have to assess them and know what they’re  going to do before they do it, where they are coming from, their missions and objectives, their strengths  and weaknesses (work on that), talk to your customers, SWOT analysis for your company and your  competition ex: Ben and Jerrys – has social mission as well, measure success on that too, have expectations that  their suppliers are ecofriendly and ethical like free range eggs, gives incentives for suppliers to be  ethical, intermediaries: retailers, marketing research on flavours, customers are retailers and consumers  directly (shops/online), need to convince retailers to buy it January 18, 2013 competition – don’t misidentify, don’t think too narrowly!!, not just other companies that produce  similar product, anyone who produces something that satisfies same want, anticipate and beat  competition at what they’re going to do (future, long term perspective) SWOT analysis – framework for reviewing strategy, position and direction of a company ▯ trengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats
More Less

Related notes for MARK301

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit