Class Notes (922,989)
CA (543,034)
UTSG (45,883)
ANT (1,765)
ANT100Y1 (1,007)
Lecture

Archaeological Record

5 Pages
55 Views

Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANT100Y1
Professor
Christopher Watts

This preview shows pages 1-2. Sign up to view the full 5 pages of the document.
Anthropology October 28th, 2010.
Archaeological Record
The matrices in which artifacts, ecofacts, sites and other human-manufactured features or
results of past human action are found
Three Typical Elements of Archaeological Research
Observed material culture
Unobserved human/non-human activity
Interpretation/explanation of human activity
Material Evidence
Physical:
-Artifacts
-Features
-Ecofacts
Spatial:
-Activity areas
-Sites
-Regions
Artifacts
Any portable object where form has been shaped (i.e. manufactured or modified)
by way of human activity
Feature
Nonportable material evidence of human activity (e.g. hearths, storage pits,
postholes)
Ecofacts
Non-artifactual material evidence of human activity
Can be further subdivided into Macrofossils and Microfossils
Macrofossils
Visible to the naked eye, e.g. kernel of corn
Can be retrieved through flotation or normal excavation procedures
Flotation Device
Water separation of soil matrices
Used primarily to recover macrofossils
Lighter materials float to the surface, caught in sieves
Microfossils
www.notesolution.com
Anthropology October 28th, 2010.
E.g. pollen, phytoliths found in soils or residues adhering to artifacts
Retrieved through mechanical and chemical disaggregation
Visible only under high-power magnification, 200X or greater
Archaeological Site
Can be defined in a number of ways
Usually consists of a collection of activity areas containing any of the following:
-Artifacts
-Ecofacts
-Features
Provenience (Provenance)
Physical location in three dimensional space
Site level:
-Grid system
Regional level:
-Map co-ordinates
-Settlement features
-(e.g. roads, towns)
Site Formation Processes
Affected by:
Human agencies
-E.g. curating/discard of objects
Natural Agencies
-e.g. soil composition, environment, temperature, disturbance by animals
(taphonomic processes)
Finding Archaeological Sites
Note: a number of sites are found by accident!
Field Methods:
Surface Techniques
-Field walking: used to survey ploughed areas; very efficient
-Testpitting: used to survey areas that cannot be examined by other methods
-Aerial photography, satellite imaging: great tool for finding sites, or identifying
area of high potential. Works well when here are large-scale landscape features
-Remote sensing
Subsurface Techniques
-Excavation
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Anthropology October 28 , 2010. Archaeological Record The matrices in which artifacts, ecofacts, sites and other human-manufactured features or results of past human action are found Three Typical Elements of Archaeological Research Observed material culture Unobserved humannon-human activity Interpretationexplanation of human activity Material Evidence Physical: - Artifacts - Features - Ecofacts Spatial: - Activity areas - Sites - Regions Artifacts Any portable object where form has been shaped (i.e. manufactured or modified) by way of human activity Feature Nonportable material evidence of human activity (e.g. hearths, storage pits, postholes) Ecofacts Non-artifactual material evidence of human activity Can be further subdivided into Macrofossils and Microfossils Macrofossils Visible to the naked eye, e.g. kernel of corn Can be retrieved through flotation or normal excavation procedures Flotation Device Water separation of soil matrices Used primarily to recover macrofossils Lighter materials float to the surface, caught in sieves Microfossils www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit